Category Archives: Grendene

Grendene Q1 2017 Results Review May 8 2017

Grendene Q1 2017 Results Review May 8 2017

Grendene recently reported its Q1 2017 results.  Net revenue grew by 7.2% as domestic revenue grew 23.6%, export revenue declined by 19.1%, and sales taxes and deductions increased by 22%. With regard to pricing, net ASP fell by 1.1% and volume increased by 8.5%. Within Brazil, domestic ASP increased by 7.0% and volume increased by 13.0%. In export markets, ASP declined by 19.8% in BRL terms and 0.3% in USD.  In Q1 2017 Brazil was clearly much stronger than export markets.

 

The table above illustrates total volume, ASP, domestic market volume, domestic ASP, export volume, export ASP in BRL, and export ASP in USD. The company seems to have significant seasonality.

 

In volume terms, Q1 is typically an average quarter overall but it is a weak quarter in the domestic market and a stronger quarter in the export markets. Q1 2017 volume was weak overall relative to the average Q1 volume with domestic volume slightly above the average Q1 volume and export volume well below the typical Q1 volume.

 

The chart above illustrates volume over the trailing twelve months (TTM) for the domestic, export, and a combination of the two (overall). TTM volumes peaked for Grendene in Q4 2013 and fell by 7.7% per annum overall with both domestic and export markets declining by the roughly the same amount.

 

In ASP terms, there is a lot less seasonality with prices consistently increasing in both domestic and export markets at a rate of 2.9% in the domestic market and 3.8% in USD terms in export markets. The ability to raise prices in both domestic and export markets despite a falling volumes and a weak overall macro environment may be a good sign of the company’s pricing power. The company may also be stretching its ability to raise prices as the company sells lower cost shoes that may not provide as much value to customers at higher prices.

 

Grendene’s gross profit grew by 11.0% in Q1 2017 with its gross margin expanding by 59 basis points (bps) over Q1 2016 and 37 bps over Q4 2016. The gross margin expansion over Q1 2016 was driven primarily by a decrease in cost of goods sold per pair as the ASP decreased from BRL13.63 to BRL13.47. Cost of goods sold per pair decreased from BRL7.25 in Q1 2016 to BRL6.95 in Q1 2017. The driver was a decrease in personnel expense.

 

 

Along with higher prices during periods of weak demand, the company’s ability to increase consistently its gross margin points to pricing power.

 

Selling expenses increased by 2.2% year on year, while administrative expenses decreased by 11.7% leading to an increase in operating profit by 28.9%. The company’s continues to maintain a focus on operational efficiency.

 

The company’s increased volume and decreased costs led to a 28.9% increase in operating profit. Grendene’s working capital increased by 2.9% year on year, while PP&E increased by 4.3%.

 

Our initial investment thesis for Grendene was a company that built multiple competitive advantages in the domestic market. Within the domestic market, it is a low cost operator with scale advantage due to heavy investments in advertising, product development, automation, and process improvements. It produces a low priced experienced good and has built a strong brand allowing for pricing power. Grendene’s exports are at the low end of the cost curve ensuring the company stays competitive in export markets. The company is run by owner operators with strong operational skills and an understanding of its competitive position who treat all stakeholders with respect. It also has consistently generated stable, excess profit even during periods of industry stress and has a net cash balance sheet.
We believe the quality of the business remains but the valuation is no longer as cheap as it once was. At the time of our initial recommendation, valuations were attractive with the company trading on a NOPAT yield of 10.1%, a FCF yield of 8.5%, an EV/IC of 1.6 times. Grendene is now trading at a NOPAT yield of 6.7%, a FCF yield of 6.7% and an EV/IC of 5.0 times at a time of elevated profitability.  If we were to normalize margins, Grendene would be trading at a NOPAT yield of 5.3% and a FCF yield of 5.5% making a 5% growth rate into perpetuity necessary for a double-digit return.

 

The company‘s margin of safety has been eliminated leading us to sell our position and no longer cover Grendene. We will continue to follow its developments, in case valuation become more attractive.

 

WEEKLY COMMENTARY 2/13/17- 2/19/17

WEEKLY COMMENTARY               2/13/17- 2/19/17

 

 

CURRENT POSITIONS

 

 

 

COMPANY NEWS

 

PC Jeweller report Q3 FY17 results over the past week. Demonetization impacted the quarter’s results with the company estimating sales were affected for three to four weeks. Post-demonetization, sales started improving in December and returned to normal in January. Gross margin were stable but the decline is sales resulted in a decline in profitability. Year on year sales declined by 3.4%, the number of showrooms grew from 58 in FQ3 2016 to 68 FQ3 2017, or 17%, and total square feet increased by 8% year on year from 346,855 square feet to 374,481 square feet. Year on year, the company’s operating profit declined 13.7%. Assuming during the four weeks that demonetization affected sales there was a 50% decreased in sales, no impact from demonetization would have lead to an increase in sales by roughly 16% year on year.

 

It is tough to tell how good or bad the quarter was due to demonetization. The company continues to increase its showroom footprint and sales barely declined despite demonetization. The company estimates 75% of the jewelry industry is unorganized dampening competitive pressures.

 

PC Jeweller is one of the most profitable and fastest growing companies in the Indian jewelry industry illustrating the strength of the company’s management and focus on efficiency. Management is one of the most innovative in the industry with many initiatives not seen in the industry. The company is trying to double its showroom footprint over the next five years. Despite the company’s strengths, it trades on an EV/NOPAT of 14 times and an EV/IC of 2.6 times. We will maintain our current position size.

 

In the past week, Grendene reported Q4 2016 and full year results. For the full year 2016, net sales declined by 7.2% with domestic sales falling by 1.6% and export sales falling by 16.3%.

 

Overall volume declined by 9.3% with domestic volume declining by 8.0% and export volumes falling by 13.0%.

 

ASP increased by 4.1% with domestic ASP increasing by 7.2% and export ASP falling by 3.2%. Gross profit fell by 6.7% as cost of goods sold declined by 7.6%.

 

Operating profit declined by in 7.5%. The company’s capital intensity did not change over the year with working capital at 47.9% of sales, fixed capital at 18.9% of sales, and invested capital at 66.8% of sales.

 

Grendene’s key value drivers are illustrated above. In 2016, gross margin reached a peak level of 48.7%. Selling expenses remain near its historical average relative to sales at 24.0%. General and administrative is at its peak at 4.8% of sales. EBIT margin remained at its historical peak of 20.0%. Working capital remains slightly elevated relative to historical averages. Fixed capital as a percentage is at its highest level over the past eleven years.

 

Grendene continues to struggle with economic weakness in Brazil and in export markets. The company operational efficiency allows the company to maintain its profitability during a period of declining revenue. In 2015, the company reiterated its growth targets of revenue growth of 8-12% and net income growth of 12-15%. The company continues to believe these targets are achievable but acknowledge risks of not achieving these results are increasing due to economic weakness in Brazil and in exports markets.

 

Given the new data, we update Grendene’s earnings valuation range. Grendene illustrated its ability to maintain profitability despite a period of declining revenues and increasing competitive pressures making earnings valuation the most appropriate valuation methodology.

 

Looking at Grendene’s earnings valuation, the company reaches our target return of 15% per year under the most optimistic scenarios. We would assume perpetuity growth only under scenarios when the company operates in an industry with barriers to entry and pricing power. Within the domestic market, there are clear barriers to entry with the company and its main competitor Alpargatas having economies of scale as they occupy over 50% of the market with large fixed costs in the form of distribution and advertising. Grendene also has unique capabilities in manufacturing plastic products as it modifies its own machines and can formulate plastics that are unavailable to other footwear producers. These barriers to entry do not transfer outside of Brazil. The company is a low cost producer with only China producing exports at a lower price.

 

The question is whether the barriers to entry within Brazil translate to pricing power. The barriers to entry within the segment means very few other players could sell products at the Grendene’s and Alpargatas’ price range meaning the company’s probably do have some pricing power in Brazil. Over the past ten years, the company average selling price increased by 3.8% per annum with the domestic selling price increasing by 2.6% and export selling pricing increasing by 3.9% in USD terms so there is a strong argument for potential pricing power. We assume 2.5% pricing power in our base case scenario. The company sales have grown at 6.8% over the past ten years with growth stagnating at 4.9% over the past five years. Assuming an inability to growth operating profit above sales growth a 5% growth rate seems appropriate for our five-year forecast period. Despite the company’s ability to maintain profitability during the recent industry weakness using peak margins seems aggressive therefore average margins are more appropriate. Our base case scenario is 5% forecast period growth, 2.5% terminal growth and average operating margins leading an upside to the 2021 fair value of 60% or 9.9% annualized return. Overall, the average return over the next five years under the earnings valuation is 59% or 9.7%.

 

 

INTERESTING LINKS

 

 

How much is growth worth? (Musing on Markets)

 

Professor Damodaran breakdowns how to value growth, the key drivers of growth, and the importance of ROIC in determing whether growth is valuable or not. (link)

 

 

Narrative and Numbers: How a number cruncher learned to tell stories! (Musing on Markets)

 

Another post by Professor Damodaran explaining how narratives can be worked into your valuation to provide a better picture of how the market is valuing a company. (link) Professor Damodaran recently published a book Narrative and Numbers, which I have not read but is next on my list.

 

 

Diversification..again.. (Oddball Stocks)

 

Nate Tobik of Oddball Stocks shares his thoughts on diversification. (link) Our current thoughts on diversification and position sizing can be viewed here. (link) We have a similar thought process on the limits of one’s knowledge as an outside investor with valuation being the biggest tool to offset the limits of our knowledge.

 

 

Humility and knowledge (Oddball Stocks)

 

Related to his post on diversification, Mr. Tobik discusses how investors sometimes make the mistake of believing they know too much. (link)  We touched on a similar topic in our diversification post linked above.

 

 

Graham & Doddsville (Columbia Business School)

 

Columbia Business School put out another edition of Graham & Doddsville, which always makes for interesting reading. (link)

 

 

Buffett’s Three Categories of Returns on Capital (Base Hit Investing)

 

Base Hit Investing’s John Huber talks about how Buffett categorizes business by their return on capital and capital requirements. (link)

 

 

What Does Nevada’s $35 Billion Fund Manager Do All Day? Nothing (Wall Street Journal)

 

The Wall Street Journal profiles the Steve Edmundson, the investment chief for the Nevada Public Employees’ Retirement. (link)

 

 

Howard Marks’ Letters Sorted by Topic (Anil Kumar Tulsiram)

 

Anil Kumar Tulsiram complied all Howard Marks’ letters by topic. He has compiled other documents in the past and can be followed on Twitter @Anil_Tulsiram. (link)

 

WEEKLY COMMENTARY 2/6/17-2/12/17

WEEKLY COMMENTARY               2/6/17-2/12/17

 

 

CURRENT POSITIONS

 

 

 

COMPANY NEWS

 

After the company’s recent share price appreciation, Grendene’s estimated five-year annualized return has fallen to roughly 10% base on scenario analysis.

 

There are barriers to entry within Grendene’s Brazilian business. Within Brazil, it is a low cost operator with scale advantage due to heavy investments in advertising, product development, automation, and process improvements. It produces a low priced experienced good with a strong brand allowing for pricing power. Grendene’s exports are at the low end of the cost curve ensuring the company stays competitive in export markets but growth in exports markets will come with lower profitability due to the weakened competitive position and excess returns.

 

Owner operators with strong operational skills, an understanding of its competitive position, and who treat all stakeholders with respect run the company. It also has consistently generated stable, excess profit even during periods of industry stress and has a net cash balance sheet.

 

Given the company’s expected return, the company’s competitive position, and the strength of management, we are decreasing our position size to 2.0%. Please review our initiation (link) for a more in-depth discussion on the company.

 

 

INTERESTING LINKS

 

 

My Interview with Jason Zweig (Safal Niveshak)

 

Vishal Khandelwal interviews Jason Zweig, who provides some very good ideas on improving your investment process. (link)

 

 

The Making of a Brand (Collaboration Fund)

 

In a wonderful article, Morgan Housel of the Collaboration Fund discusses the history of brands and what a brand is. (link)

 

 

Riding a retail roll out (Phil Oakley)

 

Phil Oakley discusses the difficulty in investing in retail rollouts. (link)

 

 

January 2017 Data Update 7: Profitability, Excess Returns and Governance (Musing on Markets)

 

Professor Damodaran provides some interesting statistics on ROIC across geographies and sectors. (link)

 

 

Investing Mastery Through Deliberate Practice (MicroCap Club)

 

Chip Maloney talks about the benefits of deliberate practice and how to use deliberate practice to make you a better investor. (link)

 

 

Out with the old (Investor Chronicle)

 

Todd Wenning provides insight on when to sell your investments (link)

 

 

2 Bitter Truths of Stock Valuation…and How You Can Avoid Them (Safal Niveshak)

 

Vishal Khandelwal highlights potential mistakes in valuing companies and how to avoid them. (link)

 

 

Revlon’s restructuring plan represents the future of legacy beauty (Glossy)

 

Glossy magazine writes about the beauty business. (link)

 

 

6 smart tips for micro-cap investors (Morningstar)

 

Ian Cassel gives readers 6 tips for micro-cap investors. These are useful for all investors. (link)

 

 

HAW PAR CORPORATION (HPAR:SP)

 

 

Company Description

 

Haw Par Corporation is a corporation with two operating businesses and strategic investments. The company’s two operating businesses are healthcare and leisure. The company’s healthcare business is the owner of the Tiger Balm, a well-known topical analgesic. The company’s leisure business own and operate two aquariums: Underwater World Singapore in Sentosa and Underwater World Pattaya in Thailand. The company also has investments in property and quoted securities.

 

 

Healthcare

 

Haw Par’s healthcare business manufactures and markets Tiger Balm and Kwan Loong. Tiger Balm is a renowned ointment used worldwide to invigorate the body as well as to relieve aches and pains. Its product extensions such as Tiger Balm Medicated Plaster, Tiger Balm Joint Rub, Tiger Balm Neck and Shoulder Rub, Tiger Balm Mosquito Repellent Patch and Tiger Balm ACTIVE range cater to the lifestyle needs of a new health-conscious generation..At first glance, the company’s healthcare business looks like a very attractive business. Tiger Balm is a trusted brand that has been around for over 100 years and generates very strong profitability.

 

Over the past four years, the healthcare business has increased sales by 18.4% per year while increasing its operating margin by 4.4 percentage points per annum and asset turnover by 0.14 per annum leading to an increase in its ROA from 27.7% in 2012 to 60.9% in 2015.

 

The majority of Haw Par’s health care business revenues are in Asia, but the company is growing fastest in America.

 

The company’s strategy for the healthcare business is to drive growth from further product penetration across existing markets to widen the brand franchise for Tiger Balm. The company has launched new products in several markets. Sales of Tiger Balm’s range of traditional and new products continued to grow in most of its key markets. The healthcare business’ margins improvement is due to lower commodity prices mitigating the pressures from rising staff costs amid tight labor markets.

 

 

Leisure

 

Haw Par’s leisure business owns two aquariums, Underwater World Singapore and Underwater World Pattaya.

 

In 2012, the company’s two aquariums attracted 1.48 million visitors at an average price of SGD20.50 leading to a SGD30.3 million in sales. The company generated operating profit of SGD11.80 million and a ROA of 45.8%. In 2015, the company attracted 0.76 million visitors to its two aquariums at an average price of SGD16.85 leading to SGD12.74 million in sales. The company had operating profit of SGD0.15 million, a segment profit of SGD-4.34 million and a ROA of 1.3%.  From 2012 to 2015, the number of visitors to the company’s two aquariums declined by 20% per year and the average price per visitor declined by 6.3% per year causing a sales to drop by 25.1% per year. The high level of fixed costs in the business saw operating profit fall by 76.8% per year.

 

The decline in the leisure business was caused by a decline in tourism and stiff competition from existing and new attractions, including direct competitors within the immediate vicinity of the two aquariums.

 

The leisure business is a great business as long as you are attracting a sufficient number of visitors to your property as the business is primarily fixed costs. Unfortunately, competition can easily enter the market in your vicinity decreasing the number of visitors at your property causing a decline in sales as you drop prices to attract people and an even greater decline in operating profit due to the operating leverage in the business.

 

 

Property

 

Haw Par’s owns three properties in Singapore and one in Kuala Lumpur. Of the company’s four properties, three are office buildings and one is an industrial building.

 

At the end of 2015, the company has total letable area of 45,399 square meters with an occupancy rate of 64.6%.

 

In 2015, the property division generated sales of SGD14.33 million, operating profit of SGD8.56 and ROA of 4.0%.  The division’s occupancy rate has fallen by almost 30 percentage points from 2013 to 2015, this could be due to a weaker environment or a deterioration of the properties’ competitive position as newer properties become available. I am not a big fan of property investments, as they tend to have poor return on assets and require significant leverage to generate a return near our required rate of return of 15%. On top of the poor profitability in the business, Haw Par’s occupancy rates have been falling potentially pointing to a weaker competitive position of the company’s properties.

 

 

Investments

 

Since 2012, Haw Par’s investment business accounted for 76.7% of the assets on the company’s balance sheet. At the end of 2015, United Overseas Bank (UOB:SP) accounted for 66.4% of the company’s available for sale securities, UOL Group (UOL:SP) accounted for 13.0%, and United Industrial Corp (UIC:SP) accounted for 9.5%.  United Overseas Bank, UOL Group, and United Industrial are all related parties as Wee Cho Yaw is the Chairman of Haw Par and the three other corporations.

 

Profit before tax is dividend income. Since 2012, the investment business has generated an average dividend income of 3.2%.

 

Since 1987, United Overseas Bank’s average annualized return was 7.0%, UOL Group’s was 5.2%, and United Industrial’s was 1.2%, nowhere near an acceptable return.

 

 

Management

 

Members of management are owner operators with insiders owning roughly 60% of Haw Par.  Management is doing a great job operating Tiger Balm but the rest of the business is a capital allocation nightmare with poor investments in leisure and property along with significant cross holdings in other family businesses.

 

Management also extracts far too much value with the average remuneration to key management personnel over the past two years at 9.9% of operating income. Operating income is used rather than profit before tax as the investment income and property income are poor capital allocation decision and it would be best if that money were returned to shareholders.  Since the income generated below operating profit detracts value it is best if operating profit is used. There are related party transactions outside of key management compensation. The company has no related party transactions.

 

 

Valuation

 

The poor capital allocation and management value extraction makes the business nothing more than a deep value holding, which would require at least 50% upside using conservative assumptions to be investible. To value the company, we value the healthcare business based off a multiple of operating profit and value all other division based on liquidation value due to the poor trends see in those businesses.

 

Given the quality and growth in Haw Par’s healthcare business, we believe 15 times operating profit is a fair multiple for the business. The company’s leisure business is given no value as the number of visitors continues to decline due to newer attractions and the company’s operating leverage means the company was barely breaking even in 2015. Cash and net working capital is valued at 100% of balance sheet value. The company’s property is seeing declining occupancy rates. We conservatively assume this to be a sign of the property’s deteriorating competitive position. There are also fees associated with any liquidation therefore we value the property assets at 75% of current value. The company’s available for sale securities are assumed to be liquidated at 75% of current value, as the holdings are so large that they would have a market impact if Haw Par ever tried to sell its shares.

 

Overall, Haw Par would be interesting below SGD7.50 but only as a deep value holding given the poor capital allocation and high management salaries.

WEEKLY COMMENTARY 12/13/16 – 12/19/16

WEEKLY COMMENTARY 12/13/16 – 12/19/16

 

 

POSITIONING

 

 

 

 

COMPANY NEWS

 

Grendene changed its auditor from PWC to E&Y due its requirement to change its auditor every five years.

 

We were thinking about PC Jeweller and the potential evolution of the jewelry retail industry in India. When think about industry evolution in Emerging Markets, we often look to developed markets for roadmaps. Each market has idiosyncrasies but strategic logic should hold from industry to industry across geographies. For example, the retail market structure in India should eventually look like retail market structure in the US as the industry develops. Retailing is fiercely competitive in all markets with no barriers to entry therefore all industries should have many competitors with very few if any generating significant sustained excess profits.

 

Our main reference point for the following information on the US Jewelry market is Edahn Golan Diamond Research & Data’s 2015 US Jewelry State of the Market report. You can download the report here. According to the Jewelers Board of Trade, there were 21,463 specialty jewelry retailers accounting for 43% of the US jewelry and watch retail market. The vast majority of these specialty stores are independent with Signet Jewelers being the largest retailer accounting for 4.3% of overall jewelry sales in the US and 9.8% of specialty jewelry sales. Signet Jewelers had roughly 3,000 stores at the end of 2015.  Despite market development and industry maturation, the US jewelry market remains fragmented with thousands of players illustrating a lack of barriers to entry and continued competitive pressures.

 

The lack of barriers to entry puts a cap on Signet’s and Tiffany’s ability generate excess profits with their average ROIC over the last five years below 15%.

 

Looking at the United States jewelry retail industry as a roadmap leads one to believe that fragmentation will persist within the Indian jewelry retail industry.

 

Another use of the roadmap is the potential multiple the market gives a company during maturity.  Signet’s EV/IC has ranged from 1.69 in 2012 to 2.89 at the end of 2015, while Tiffany’s EV/IC ranged from 2.54 at the end of 2016 to 3.55 at the end of 2015.

 

Signet’s EV/EBIT ranged from 6.86 in 2012 to 18.94 in 2015. Tiffany’s EV/EBIT ranged from 11.84 in 2016 to 37.19 in 2014, with operating Income in 2014 was depressed. Accounting for the depressed operating income, EV/EBIT ranged from 11.84 to 14.49.

 

We have included similar analysis on Honworld (condiments) and Universal Health (pharmacies/pharmaceutical distribution) that we did in the past at the end of the weekly commentary.

 

 

INTERESTING LINKS

 

Deep Dive into China’s Apparel Market (Fung Business Intelligence)

Fung Business Intelligence freely provide a lot of good information on China. In this multi-part report, Fung Business Intelligence provides detail on China’s Apparel Market. (Part 1) (Part 2)

 

Asahi to Buy SABMiller’s Eastern European Beers in $7.8 Billion Deal (Bloomberg)

Acquisition news is always interesting as a knowledgeable player in the market puts a value on an assets based on a detailed analysis. The problem is we do not know the assumptions the acquirer is using, which are crucial, but it gives an idea of an appropriate valuation multiple in an industry. The paragraph below is from the Bloomberg article.

 

The offer values the SABMiller assets at about 15 times Ebitda of 493.8 million euros for the year ended March 2016, according to Bloomberg calculations. That compared with the median of about 11.5 times trailing twelve-month Ebitda for 9 brewery acquisitions announced worldwide in the past five years, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

 

We extended the sample size of acquisitions back to 1999 and the median acquisition multiple was 11.7 times not far off the 11.5 times paid over the last twelve months.

 

 

 

The table below shows the upside to the 11.7 times multiple for various brewers in Emerging Markets.

 

 

 

Median Buyout EV/EBITDA Ratios Rising (PitchBook via ValueWalk)

 

The PitchBook examines the median buyout multiple for private value investors.  (link)  What we find interesting is the disconnect between what business owners are willing to pay and the valuations public market investors are willing to pay for companies.

 

 

The Undoing Project: A Friendship That Changed Our Minds (The Rational Walk)

 

The Rational Walk discusses Michael Lewis’ new book about pioneers in Behavioural Finance and how it relates to investing. (link)

 

 

The Story of How McDonald’s First Got Its Start (Smithsonian)
The story of the history of the McDonald brothers before McDonald’s became a multi-chain restaurant. (link)

 

 

What is Your Edge? (Base Hit Investing)

 

An article discussing three types of edges in investing. (link)  We view our biggest edge over other market participants is a time horizon edge as we are looking for stocks for the next three to five years.  This also brings an analytical edge as we are analyzing business from the view point of a business owner rather than trying to figure out if the company will beat next quarter’s expectations.

 

 

Buffett’s Three Categories of Returns on Capital (Base Hit Investing)

 

An older post discussing how Buffett categorizes businesses (link)

 

 

HONWORLD DEVELOPED MARKET ROADMAP

 

As mobility increases in China, cultures converge leading to a more homogenous tastes and markets.  This will take generations to play out but when it does it leads to a national market similar to many developed market like the US. The cultural convergence leads to the ability to apply fixed costs to a larger market increasing consolidation and dominance of larger players as smaller players cannot reach the minimum efficient scale required to compete.

 

The significant fixed costs in the form of advertising and distribution allows a brand to be built by larger competitors as more customers can be reached and educated. A brand is particularly important in an industry with a low priced product as the brand decreases search costs for customers leading to potential habit forming behavior. For example in the US, customers have acquired a taste for Heinz Ketchup.  When a customer goes to the store given Heinz may cost as little $2.50 a bottle and the Heinz brand represent a known and liked product that customer is not going to spend anytime even thinking about another brand given very little benefit.

In addition, retailers only have so much shelf space and are unlikely to place 15 to 20 different cooking wines on the shelf as a good number of the 15 or 20 cooking wines will not sell leading to waste shelf space.  The biggest players have a tremendous advantage as retailers now they will sell.

 

The table below shows the market structure of the five largest condiment markets in the US.

 

The US condiment industry is a great example of industry consolidation in a more developed market and a good roadmap for the Chinese Cooking Wine industry. The lowest concentration ratio among the largest five US condiment markets is the Hot Sauce market with a 52.2% four firm concentration ratio, while the highest is Ketchup with a 78.6% three firm concentration ratio. The four firm concentration ratio in the Chinese Cooking Wine segment is only 26.8% so there is potential for significant consolidation. The low four firm concentration ratio reiterates the fragmented regional nature of the market.

 

 

UNIVERSAL HEALTH DEVELOPED MARKET ROADMAP

 

Market Structure

 

The pharmaceutical retail segment in China is fragmented. According to the China Food and Drug Administration, in November 2013, there were 433,873 chain and individual drug stores in China, 10,150 more stores than 2012. There are 3,376 enterprises with multiple locations in China. Enterprises with multiple locations are more likely to manage the business for profitability and close down unprofitable stores. All though the market is fragmented, market consolidation is underway with Universal Health and Sinopharm leading the way. Retail competition comes in the form of target customer bases, business models, and product portfolios.

 

At the time of its IPO, Universal Health was the largest pharmaceutical retailer in Northeast China with 794 self operated outlets.  There is not sufficient information to get a sense of the efficiency of each store as competitors with higher revenue per store maybe a function of bigger stores, but it seems Universal Health’s may not be as efficient as competitors. This poor efficiency may be due to acquiring less efficient stores and improving operations. The pharmacy market in Northeast China has low level of concentration with a 2012 five firm concentration ratio of 44.2%.  This only tells part of the story as there could be a large number of smaller independent stores.  Universal Health has increased its estimated market share in Northeast China retail from 5.7% in 2012 to an estimated 8.8% in 2014.

 

The largest distributors in Northeast China at the time of the IPO are listed below. Universal Health is the largest private pharmaceutical distributor in Northeast China.

 

 

The largest retail pharmacy chains in China are listed below.  In 2012, the largest pharmacy operator had a 2.1% market share.  The 2012 five firm concentration ratio was 9.4%, while the ten firm concentration ratio was 16.0% indicating a very fragmented market. At the end of 2012, Universal Health’s China retail market share was 40bps.

 

The Chinese pharmaceutical distribution market is less fragmented than the retail market but still exhibits low concentration with the leading player accounting for 16.8% of the overall market.  The five firm concentration ratio is 36.5% and the ten firm concentration ratio is 44.9%. Universal Health garnered 16 bps of the total Chinese pharmaceutical distribution market.

 

While each individual country has its own idiosyncrasies leading to different development paths, the market structure of more developed markets may give a roadmap for developing countries.

 

The US pharmacy market shows moderate levels of concentration with a five firm concentration ratio of 64.4%.  There is some fragmentation but there are a significant number of small players still operating in the market.

 

According to Canada’s Office of Consumer Affairs, the Canadian pharmacy market has a 2012 four firm concentration ratio of 68.6%. The largest company is Shoppers Drug Mart with a 31.8% market share followed by Katz Group with a 16.7% market share, Jean Coutu with a 12.2% market share, and McKesson with a 7.9% market share.

 

According to the Pharmaceutical Journal, in the UK, there are 14,361 pharmacies with 4,201 independent owners, owning up to five pharmacies, operating 5,590 pharmacies and 174 multiple owners, owning six or more pharmacies, operating 8,771 pharmacies.  Large owners and supermarkets account for 52% of the overall market.

 

The US’s, Canada’s, and UK’s pharmacy market structures point to a much more consolidated market than the Chinese market but not the oligopolistic market structure you would expect if there was a significant benefit from economies of scales.  There seems to be economies of scale in purchasing but only to a point. Another reason for the fragmentation and large number of small independent operators may be that independent operators do the job for something other than profit maximization.  Just like optometrists or dentists, the ability to be your own boss and make a decent living trumps the desire to sell to a larger chain or exit when faced with a competitive disadvantage.

 

Pharmaceutical distribution markets are far more concentrated in developed countries than China with a three firm concentration ratio ranging from 43% to 85%.  Developed pharmaceutical distributors, economies of scale manifest themselves in high capital efficiency as operating margins often struggle to reach 2%.   The high fixed costs associated with upfront investments and low marginal cost for selling an additional unit leads to very high competitive rivalry among distributors and the need to utilize fixed costs as much as possible leading to greater profitability.

 

 

Honworld H1 2016 Report Review and Position Sizing October 9, 2016

Honworld H1 2016 Report Review and Position Sizing October 9, 2016

 

Honworld recently released its H1 2016 report.  In the first half of 2016, the company’s revenues increased by only 0.9% and its gross profit and operating profit contracted by 2.5% and 10.2% respectively.

 

Honworld stated the cause of the slowing in sales growth was a slowing of the Chinese condiment industry as well as a shift in its distribution channel strategy from supermarkets to more traditional channels and the catering market. Additionally, the company altered its product mix to better serve the new distribution channels leading higher sales of medium range products, which we estimate as having roughly 50% gross margin compared to gross margin of 65-75% for high end and premium products. The company did not provided a breakdown of sales by product category or gross margins of product categories both of which would be very useful for any analyst trying to understand the business and should be disclosed by the company.

 

The table below illustrates the growth in the H1 2016 of various condiment makers with Honworld performing at the bottom of the pile for growth illustrating company specific issue more than an industry slowdown was the reason for weaker growth.

h1-2016-chinese-condiment-producers-growth

 

Operating margin declined due to an increase in advertising, distribution and research and development expenses. These are all fixed cost that the company should spend significantly on to take advantage of its size advantage over peers making much more difficult for peers to compete.

 

The big concern has been capital allocation of the company. Honworld stated in its annual report that it had reached an optimal inventory level with inventory levels remaining stable in H1 2016 compared to H1 2015. Despite the stable inventory levels, Honworld did not generate strong operating cash flows as both short term and long term prepayments increased significantly. The increase in prepayments could be attributed to growth plans of the company or it could something else.  It is a bit concerning that in the company’s first period to prove its ability to generate cash flow due to minimal inventory investment it was unable due to an increase in a soft account.

 

Overall, it was a disappointing set of results with growth slowing and free cash flow not increasing despite minimal investment in inventory.

 

We are moving to a new approach for position sizing.  There are significant limits to any investor’s knowledge given you cannot now everything inside a company particularly in smaller companies where there is less outside evidence to collaborate one’s ideas. Most investors base much of their analysis on the financial statements provided by the company being researched. For example, the primary driver of the quality of a business is the ability of a company to generate high returns on invested capital. If the financial statements are not an accurate reflection then any investment analysis will be completely off base.  Inaccurate financial statements happen quite frequently with Chinese companies. The lack of trust creates a need for a less aggressive position size therefore all Chinese companies will start at a 2.0% position and increase with evidence that provides credibility of accurate financial statements. Outside investment in Honworld by Lunar Capital improve the credibility of Honworld’s financial statements; unfortunately, an inability to generate free cash flow is a sign of a bad business or bad management decisions. In the case of Honworld, the business seems great with a very strong marginal economics. Unfortunately, management is misallocating capital in a quest to build mammoth inventory levels decreasing returns on invested capital and increasing the need for outside funding if the company keeps growing. The need for outside funding decreases potential returns for investors due to dilutive nature of growth.

 

Additionally during a period of weak growth, when there is minimal investment in inventory the company is unable to generate free cash flow due to a increase in prepayments is concerning. We are decreasing our position size in Honworld to 2.0% and selling at HKD4.50 or above.

 

Deep value investments outside of Hong Kong and Chinese will be 2.0% positions as these are inherent weaker businesses. As you move up the quality spectrum, our maximum position size will increase with the maximum position at 10.0%. Good businesses that are undervalued will start at 2.0% increasing to potentially 6.0% as undervaluation increases. Good businesses generate strong cash flow and profitability and operate in a growing market but may not have competitive advantage. Current examples are PC Jeweller and Zensar Technologies.

 

High quality businesses with competitive advantages that are close to fairly valued will start at 2.0% and increase to potentially 10.0% based on the level of undervaluation.  Current examples are Credit Analysis and Research, ANTA, Turk Tuborg, Grendene.

 

The new position sizing comes with understanding of the limits to our knowledge and the reliance on financial statements published by companies in formulating investment strategies.   Our previous position sizing seems a bit too aggressive. Our goal is to get between 20-30 investment ideas offering sufficient diversity to buffer against any potential  bad investments while still offer enough concentration to take advantage of upside from good investments.

Grendene Position Size August 5, 2016

Grendene Position Size August 5, 2016

 

We sold 1,040,700 Grendene shares at an average price of BRL17.2365 per share at an average exchange rate of USDBRL 3.2420 equaling just over USD5.5 million. The cost postion on our Grendene shares is BRL16.74 with an average exchange rate of USDBRL 3.8535. Grendene is now just under a 5.0% position. The goal of the sale was to decrease the position size after increasing the position size when Grendene’s shares fell earlier this year.

Decreasing Grendene Position Size July 28, 2016

Decreasing Grendene Position Size July 28, 2016

We increased our position size in Grendene when its price declined below BRL15.00 per share.  The price is now back around where we initiated our position (>BRL17.00) so for consistency we should have a position size close to our initial position size therefore we are decreasing our position size by USD4.5 million but we are only selling if Grendene’s price is above BRL17.00 per share.

There is no change to the investment thesis. Within the domestic market, Grendene is a low cost operator with scale advantage due to heavy investments in advertising, product development, automation, and process improvements.  It produces a low priced experienced good and has built a strong brand allowing for pricing power. Grendene’s exports are at the low end of the cost curve ensuring the company stays competitive in export markets.  Management are owner operators with a culture of operational efficiency.  The expected return in a Grendene investment is still above 15%.

Grendene Initiation Report November 19, 2015

Below is a link to the Grendene, formerly known as Company 11/29/2015, initiation report  from November 19, 2015.

Grendene SA Initiation November 19 2015

 

INVESTMENT THESIS

 

Grendene is a Brazilian plastics manufacturer and one of the largest footwear producers in the world.  The company built multiple competitive advantages in the domestic market and the company is trying to replicate these advantages in the export market.  Within the domestic market, it is a low cost operator with scale advantage due to heavy investments in advertising, product development, automation, and process improvements.  It produces a low priced experienced good and has built a strong brand allowing for pricing power. Grendene’s exports are at the low end of the cost curve ensuring the company stays competitive in export markets.

 

The company is run by owner operators with strong operational skills and an understanding of its competitive position who treat all stakeholders with respect.  It also has consistently generated stable, excess profit even during periods of industry stress and has a net cash balance sheet.

 

Despite the company’s strengths, there is upside to the bear case scenario of no growth and trough margins with the company trading on a 10.1% NOPAT yield and an 8.5% FCF yield. Total estimated annualized return over the next five years is 15-17%. Grendene seems to be undervalued.