Category Archives: Veto Switchgears and Cables

WEEKLY COMMENTARY NOV 7 2016 – NOV 14 2016

WEEKLY COMMENTARY NOV 7 2016 – NOV 14 2016

 

COMPANY NEWS

 

PC Jeweller declined by 14% over the last three days of the week as the Indian Government decided to ban all INR500 and INR1,000 notes to fight black money. Roughly, 80% of the industry sales are in cash. In the short term, there will be an impact. In the longer term, it may increase the attractiveness of gold and jewelry as a store of value as credibility of the government and its potential actions decrease. It may also help consolidate the market in the organized sector. PC Jeweller offers a 7.8% NOPAT yield. We are maintaining the current position size of 2.0% for now with any further price declines probably prompting a position size increase.

 

Turk Tuborg reported Q3 2016 results with revenue increasing 39% while net profit increased by 55%. It remains extremely profitable with a Q3 2016 annualized ROIC of 151%. Turk Tuborg continues to gain share on Anadolu Efes with Anadolu Efes Turkish beer revenue increasing by 2.5% in Q3 2016. Over the past 12 months, Turk Tuborg gained 7 percentage points of market share (34% to 41%). These two players have accounted for over 99% of the industry for many years. It also is much more profitable generating 1.14 times the EBITDA of Anadolu’s Turkish beer operations on 70% of the sales. Turk Tuborg net profit was six times Anadolu’s Turkish beer operations net profit due to the financial leverage employed by Anadolu. The combined market share, a two-way distribution system (bottles and kegs account for over half the market), and the economies of scale within the industry alleviate concerns of entry from new players. Competitive rivalry is also weak despite Turk Tuborg’s share gains due to Anadolu Efes financial leverage (6.1 times EBIT in 2015), currently a big concern of the company. Anadolu is also a much bigger entity with operations all over Eastern Europe diverting their attention while Turk Tuborg is focused solely on the Turkish market. The big risk to the investment case is the increased centralized control within Turkey may decrease secularism in the country leading to prohibition. The Turkish government taxes the Turkey’s beer market heavily making it a steady stream of revenue for the government, which it may not want to lose through prohibition. Turk Tuborg now trades at an EV/ttm EBIT of 7.8 times with a net cash position almost two times ttm EBIT. We will maintain our 4.4% position potentially increasing if there are any significant share price declines.

 

 

COMPANY IN FOCUS

 

Veto Switchgears and Cables

 

Executive Summary

Veto operates in a commodity business with low barriers to entry yet only offers a NOPAT yield of 6.1%. The commodity nature of the business means growth does not add value and therefore does not generate any additional return, therefore the current expected return is 6.1% well below the required return for a commodity business.

 

Company Description

 

Veto Switchgears and Cable manufactures wires & cables, electrical accessories, industrial cables, fans, CFL lamps, pumps, modular switches, LED lights, immersion heater, MCB and distribution boards.

Veto has a distribution network of 2,500 dealers across the country with a majority of revenues coming from Rajasthan with growth opportunities in the rest of India and the Middle East. Given it growth potential, the company purchased 10,312.99 square meters in SEZ Jaipur to increase manufacturing capacity. The company’s targets reaching more than Rs.1,000 crores in sales by FY2021. The company’s current capacity and capacity utilization is illustrated below.

capacity-and-capacity-utilization

The company’s main raw materials are copper, PVC resin, and aluminum.

raw-materials

 

The company listed on the public stock exchange in 2012. The promoters own 58.19% of the company down from 71.76% at the end of December 2015.

 

Industry

The company describes the industry as fragmented with low barriers to entry therefore the only way to generate excess returns is through operating efficiency. Given the difficulties maintaining a competitive advantage, it will be difficult sustaining excess profits and therefore the company should trade at reproduction value.

 

A volatile ROIC averaging 15.8% over the past five years seems to confirm the lack of competitive advantage but the company’s capacity utilization is low providing an opportunity for the company to double its ROIC. An inconsistent gross margin is evidence of a lack of pricing power.

 

Management

Management has not overly levered the company with current net debt to 5-year average operating income of 1.95 times.

 

Management remuneration is reasonable at 2.0% of operating income in FY16 and FY15.

 

Related party transactions are relatively insignificant at 2% of sales.

 

Given the lack of barriers to entry, the company’s number one strategic focus should be operational efficiency.

 

Valuation

Assuming an 12.5% discount rate, cyclically adjusted operating margin, and cyclically adjusted capital efficiency, for the company to generate over a 10% annualized return, the company needs to grow by 20% over the next five years fading to 5% terminal growth rate in year 10. Given the lack of barriers to entry in the industry, any growth should not generate any value therefore is irrelevant making the market’s current assumptions very aggressive.

 

Veto currently offers a NOPAT yield of 6.1%. As mentioned the commodity nature of the business means growth does not add value and therefore does not generate any additional return, therefore the current expected return is 6.1% well below the required return for a commodity business.

 

Risk

Continued growth in the market alleviates competitive pressures allowing the company to main elevated returns.

 

The company fills capacity and is able to double its ROIC through much better capital efficiency.

 

Key Areas of Research Focus

  1. Operating costs relative to peers

 

 

INVESTMENT THOUGHT

 

Whether an industry has a barrier to entry or not is a key question in our investment process. In an industry with barriers to entry, competition cannot freely enter limiting the potential supply in the market allowing excess profits to be sustained. The sustainability and predictability of earnings or cash flows means an earnings or cash flow based valuation is a more appropriate valuation methodology. If barriers to entry do not exist in the industry, competition will freely enter the market leading to a reversion of profitability to the cost of capital. In times of elevated profitability, supply will increase until profitability reverts to the cost of capital. In an industry with no barriers to entry, the appropriate valuation methodology is reproduction value or the value of a new competitor to reproduce the assets of the company.

 

In a scenario of no barriers to entry, we also take into account barriers to exit. An industry with no entry barriers and no exit barriers, profitability will revert to the cost of capital as new supply enters and exits the industry. The speed of the reversion of profitability will depend on the time to add new supply, the time to eliminate supply from the market, and the growth in demand in the market. If exit barriers exist, it will be harder for supply to exit the market slowing or even halting the reversion to the mean of profitability during periods of underperformance when supply should be exiting the market. A state where industry returns persist below the cost of capital occurs and is rectified when demand growth catches up to the supply in the industry or supply exits the market.

 

In an industry with barriers to entry, growth is an important assumption in determining the value of a company. Assuming 25% ROIC and a 12.5% discount rate, every $1 invested creates $2 in value illustrating the importance of growth. In an industry with no barriers to entry, ROIC will eventually revert to the cost of capital meaning $1 invested will create no additional value making growth an irrelevant assumption.

 

The crucial strategic questions in industries with barriers to entry are what is the barrier to entry, and then is the barrier to entry strengthening or weakening. The crucial strategic questions in an industry without barriers to entry are do exit barriers exist, is supply increasing or decreasing, how long does it take to bring on supply or shut down supply,  and is the company at the low end of the cost curve as operational efficiency provides an opportunity for potential excess profits.

 

Not understanding the importance of barriers to entry leads investors to make mistakes. The thought that all growth generates value and is therefore relevant being the biggest mistake. Another mistake investors often make is assuming an industry in its early stages with strong profitability means barriers to entry exist. Often in the early stages of an industry’s life cycle, companies are able to generate excess profits as demand is growing at such a rapid pace that supply cannot keep up. The supply demand imbalance allows producers to be price takers. In most industries, the excess profits from the early stages of the industry eventually dissipate as demand growth slows and supply catches up eliminating the tightness in the market causing profitability reverts towards the cost of capital as pricing power of suppliers is eliminated. Only a small number of industries will be able to limit the supply allowing for sustained excess profits. The short-term thinking in the industry is the main culprit for the errors listed above. If an investor has focus on whether next quarter’s earnings will beat expectations, barriers to entry and industry life cycle is irrelevant, as these events may not occur for quarters or years.

 

Whether barriers to entry exist or not is an important question in our investment process determining the type of industry analysis and the valuation method used.

 

 

INTERESTING LINKS

 

CVS Warns of Prescriptions Shift, Shares Tumble on Profit Warning (Wall Street Journal)

An interesting article discussing the differences in business models of CVS and Walgreens. It is a reminder that strategy involves choosing not only what to do, but what not to do. (link)

 

Why Warren Buffed Does Not Believe in EBITDA (S&C Messina Capital Management)

While market participants regularly use EBITDA as a proxy for cash flow, we find it to be a very flawed metric therefore we use it only we there is no other option. The linked article by S&C Messina Capital Management discusses the main reasons for our suspicion of the EBITDA metric. (link)

 

Joel Greenblatt on Wealthtrack (Hurricane Capital)

Hurricane Capital took notes on Joel Greenblatt’s recent visit to Wealthtrack. Mr. Greenblatt is always insightful and a very articulate value investor. He discusses many of the key tenets of value investing. (link) You can watch the full interview here on YouTube.

 

Reader’s Questions (CSInvesting)

CSInvesting answered some readers’ questions on reproduction value and EPV with some very interesting insights. (link) CSInvesting has a lot of useful resources so it is worth the time to have a look around the website. Reproduction value and EPV are valuation techniques made famous by Bruce Greenwald. His book Value Investing: From Graham to Buffett and Beyond is one of the best value investing books ever written. Professor Greenwald also wrote Competition Demystified another invaluable resource on thinking about the competitive environment. Professor Greenwald teaches a value-investing course at Columbia Business School. A playlist of his course can be found here on YouTube. It is well worth the time to watch multiple times.

Don’t Confuse Cheap With Value (Broyhill Asset Management)

Broyhill Asset Management put together an interesting presentation on valuation multiples and what a multiple actually represents. (link)

 

Interesting Tweet Comparing Nike and Under Armour (Connor Leonard)

Apparel much more prone to trends and higher margins but a weaker competitive position as performance footwear is much more complex requiring more R&D. Additionally, performance footwear is crucial to the activity it is bought for therefore much more loyalty. Apparel is much more fashion oriented so significantly less loyalty. These views conform to our views mentioned in our Peak Sport Products and Anta Sports reports. (link)

 

Common Mistakes Made When Investing in Quality Companies (Lawrence A. Cunningham)

Mr. Cunningham was the co-author of Quality Investing: Owning the Best Companies for the Long Term. A wonderful book that is a must read for all investors thinking about investing in quality businesses. As stated in the title, the article discusses the common mistakes made when investing in quality companies. (link)