Category Archives: Misc Portfolio

Turk Tuborg & GMA Holding Position Sizes 11/6/2017

Turk Tuborg & GMA Holding Position Size 11/6/2017

 

Turk Tuborg’s position decreased 5.1% on May 12, 2017 when there was the first sales with a goal of reaching 2.0%.  The share price has increased and the stock is illiquid. The current position is 3.2%. There will be no further selling.

There is a similar liquidity issue with GMA Holding.  There will be no more buying and the GMA Holding position.  It is a 6.4% position.

Both are high quality companies that can be held for five years regardless of stock market liquidity.

The latest recommendation size of 6.0% was completed over 7 days.

Future recommendations will be in more liquid stocks. The lower limit for 6 month average daily volume will be USD100,000 in the most attractive of situations but more likely it will be above USD250,000 average daily volume.

 

 

 

New Research Report October 19, 2017

I have produced a new research report on a very liquid high quality retailer with seems to have a few competitive advantages and offers a 16.3% expected return using conservative assumptions. It will start with a 6% position size in our model portfolio.  If you are interested in the report please contact me at marcmelendez@reperiocapital.com

GMA Holdings Position Size 10/2/17

GMA Holdings Position Size 10/2/17

GMA Holdings position size is increasing to 10.0% with Reperio Capital’s model portfolio as the company is an industry that has strong barriers to entry in the form of economies of scale from content creation costs. Profit growth and free cash flow growth within the industry should mirror GDP growth due to barriers to entry and a mature industry.  Currently, revenues, operating profit, and free cash flow are showing negative growth year on year due to one-off political advertisements last year.

The market currently values the company on a EBIT yield and FCF yield of 18.4%.  Assuming the company grows below expected GDP growth (6.5%) at 5%, the expected return is over 23%.

PC Jeweller & Anscor Position Size 10/2/17

PC Jeweller & Anscor Position Size 10/2/17

The company continues to execute with strong growth in showrooms leading to good growth in sales and profitability. PC Jeweller’s share price increased by 33% over the past four months leading to an increase in valuations. The company now trades on an NOPAT yield of 4.4%.

 

The fragmentation in the market points to a lack of barriers to entry. PC Jeweller’s gross margin similar to its competitors indicates its products are undifferentiated and customer are not willing to pay a premium. The company’s capital efficiency is also on par with competitors meaning capital efficiency is not the source of excess returns. Gross margin return on inventory tells a similar story. Meaning, operational efficiencies are the driver of the PC Jeweller’s excess returns. Its operating expenses averaged 4.1% of sales over the last five years lower than any other jewelry company analyzed.

 

Operational efficiency is replicable but it is very difficult as processes and values within an organization are difficult to change, therefore, PC Jeweller’s excess profitability should persist for some time. This is backed up by the ability of the company to maintain strong profitability during the latest industry downturn. Further, the organized portion of the segment accounts for only 30% of the industry so competition is currently primarily against weaker peers. Despite the likely persistence of excess profitability, a NOPAT yield of 4.4% requires a persistence growth over 10% into perpetuity with no working capital or fixed capital investment for an investment in PC Jeweller to meet the required rate of return of 15%. The PC Jeweller position is being sold.

 

A Soriano Corporation is also very illiquid. Reperio’s model portfolio has been purchasing shares since inception and it has only reached 0.5% of the portfolio.  There will be no futher purchases or posts until the position size changes. All recommendations will meet minimum liquidity requirements.

PC Jeweller FY2017 Results 6/1/17

PC Jeweller FY2017 Results Review June 1, 2017

 

PC Jeweller reported FQ4 2017 & FY2017 results. The company continues to perform well in a difficult operating environment due to regulatory measures. FY2017 saw demonetization and a stricter regulatory environment including high value purchases require a pan card, and imposition of an excise duty. The company also issued preferred shares to DVI Mauritus and Fidelity investments with a guaranteed dividend yield of 13.0% along with a conversion option. Despite, the regulatory environment PC Jeweller grew by 15.7%. Gross profit grew by 0.3% while operating profit increased by 12.1%.

 

The company’s gross margin declined as exports were a larger portion of sales. The table below illustrates management’s estimates of gross margin by geography and product within the domestic market. Based on the midpoint of the assumptions below gross margin should be roughly 13.37%.


The company improved capital efficiency with inventory only growing by 8.3% in the year. The slight decline in the company’s NOPAT margin combined with the improved capital efficiency saw ROIC increase to 24.7% from 20.9%.  A measure used commonly used in the retail industry is gross margin on inventory. Given the biggest investment within the Indian Jewelry industry is inventory, 57% of PC Jeweller’s 2017 assets was inventory. Since 2008, inventory has accounted for 58% of assets. The typical formula is gross profit divided by average inventory. We modify it slightly by subtracting interest expense from gross profit as the company purchases inventory using gold leases that comes with an interest component.

 

Unfortunately, the GMROI continues to decline. Compared to its peers, PC Jeweller is at the lower end of GMROI. This is particularly concerning when compared to Titan Company, whose GMROI is almost three times higher than PC Jeweller’s as the company generates a higher gross margin and pays less on interest.

 

The company’s declining and poor gross margin return on inventory points to a lack of pricing power.

 

PC Jeweller increased its showroom count to 75 from 60 in FY2017, while the square footage grew by 10% from 352,313 square feet to 386,923 square feet. The company’s average store size decreased to 5,159 square feet.

 

In FY2017, domestic sales per store and square foot decreased by 15.8% and 4.2%, respectively.

 

Since, the government took drastic measures in 2013 to stunt the growth of the gold industry, the primary growth driver for PC Jeweller is new showrooms.

 

The company trialed its first franchise operations and will continue to add additional franchises fueling growth with little additional investment requirements.

 

Overall, PC Jeweller continues to execute and is one of the most profitable and fastest growing companies in the Indian jewelry industry due to the strength of the company’s management and focus on efficiency. Management is one of the most innovative in the industry with many initiatives not seen in the industry. The company is trying to double its showroom footprint over the next five years. Despite the strengths of the company and management, government is continually bringing new regulation to the detriment of the industry. Additionally, the industry is fiercely competitive with evidence pointing to no barriers to entry. As discussed in a weekly commentary, the jewelry industry evolution in more developed countries points to no barriers to entry and a compression of profitability towards the cost of capital.

 

Given our research on industry evolution, our base case involves elimination of excess profits by the end of the terminal year as competition intensifies. PC Jeweller is able to grow by 10% over the next five years before fading to 0% terminal growth leading to an estimated annualized return of 2.6%.

 

The optimistic scenario assumes the company to grow its sales by 15.0% over the next five years inline with PC Jeweller’s target of doubling its store count over the same period. In the terminal assumptions, there is assumed to be continued grow of 2.5%. Also, the company is not impacted by competitive forces allowing the company to maintain its profitability leading to an estimated annualized return of 25.4%.

 

The pessimistic scenario assumes no growth and immediate decline in profitability as well as no excess profits in the terminal assumption as competition impacts the company.  The estimated annualized return under the pessimistic scenario is -4.0%.

 

At current valuation levels, the risk rewards is no longer drastically in our favor and a sustained continuation of the company’s excess profits is needed to justify much higher valuations. We will cut our position size to 2.0% as long as the share price is above INR450.

Stalexport Autostrady Q1 2017 Results May 14, 2017

Stalexport Autostrady Q1 2017 Results May 14, 2017

Stalexport Autostrady reported Q1 2017 results. Traffic increased by 8.0% with light vehicles increasing by 7.4% and commercial vehicles increasing by 10.9%. Revenue increased by 8.2%, while operating profit declined by 4.8% as Q1 2017 saw an increase of accrued cost of provision for motorway resurfacing.  The company increased toll rates for heavy vehicles category 2 and 3 by 9.1% from PLN 16.50 to PLN 18.00 and heavy vehicles category 4 and 5 by 13.2% from PLN 26.50 to PLN 30.00.

 

The report does nothing to change our view on the company. Autostrady has a 30 year concession agreement on 60 kilometers of the A4 between Katowice (junction Murckowska, km 340.2) to Krakow (junction Balice I, km 401.1) ending March 2027. Since 2008, traffic grew at an average annual rate of 4.5% with light vehicles growing by 5.7% and heavy goods declining 0.5% per year. In 2012, there was a decline in traffic by 6.5% driven by a 23.2% decline in heavy goods vehicles. Since 2012, both light vehicles and heavy goods vehicles grew by 9.2% per year. Since 2008, the toll rates have increased by 6.8% per year with the toll rate for light goods vehicles increasing by 5.4% and the toll rate for heavy goods vehicles increasing by 12.5%. The increase in traffic and toll rates has lead to an average annual increase in revenue of 11.6% per year. Additionally, honest and competent management run the company.

 

Despite the continued growth, the company trades at a 37.4% discount to a DCF value that assumes no growth in revenue and 4% increase in administrative expenses. We will increase our target position size to 3.0% at share price below PLN4.00. Assuming a 6% growth rate, the company’s fair value is PLN7.19, 90.6% above the company’s current share price.

Turk Tuborg 2016 Full Year Results May 11, 2017

Turk Tuborg 2016 Full Year Results May 11, 2017

Turk Tuborg reported 2016 results. The company’s consolidated net sales increased by 29.6% from TRY742.68 million in 2015 to TRY962.7 million in 2016. ASP increases were the main driver of revenue growth as ASP per hectoliter (hl) increased by 30.9% from TRY245.12 in 2015 to TRY320.92 in 2016, while volume decreased by 1.0% from 3.03 million hectoliters (mhl) in 2015 to 3.00 million hectoliters in 2016. Despite the ASP increase and the volume decrease, Turk Tuborg still gained share from Anadolu Efes. Its volume share increased from 31.4% to 33.3% and its market share increased from 33.3% to 40.1%. Turk Tuborg and Anadolu control over 99% of the market so any share gain by one is at the expense of the other.

 

The table illustrates volume, volume share within Turkey, ASP, and market share within Turkey from 2008 to 2016. Since 2008, Turk Tuborg’s volume grew by 13.2% per annum, Anadolu’s volume decreased by 4.3% per annum, and the overall industry volume decline by -0.9% per annum. Since 2008, Turk Tuborg’s ASP increased by 9.9% per annum, Anadolu’s ASP increased by 7.0% per annum, and the overall industry ASP increased by 8.4% per annum.

 

In our initiation report, we believed Turk Tuborg’s product innovation and focused operations along with Anadolu Efes debt load is driving Turk Tuborg’s share gains.

 

In 2016, Turk Tuborg launched Tuborg Amber, the first and only beer in amber category of Turkey illustrating the company’s continued focus on product innovation. Anadolu continues to have operations all over Europe while Turk Tuborg remains focused on Turkey. Anadolu’s extended operations decrease the importance of Turkey on overall operations leading to less management attention. It also adds diseconomies of scale associated with administrating all the different entities. Anadolu improved its financial position to 3.6 times operating profit but capex is lower than depreciation meaning the company is unable to even maintain its current asset base, never mind spending on growth, while, Turk Tuborg grew and modernized its facilities.

 

Since 2011, Turk Tuborg’s average capex to depreciation ratio is 185% compared to Anadolu Efes’s average capex to depreciation ratio of 114%. The capex allowed it to modernize its facilities decreasing the average age of assets from 18.8 years in 2011 to 7.4 years almost on par with Anadolu Efes.

 

Despite Anadolu’s debt load, economies of scale persist. Distribution is crucial as over 50% of Turkish beer sales are through a two-way distribution system where bottles and kegs are returned. Advertising is another important fixed cost that benefits the largest players. These costs are included in the selling expense line on both companies’ income statements. Anadolu does not report Turkish beer expenses but assuming a similar split in operating expenses between administrative and selling expenses, the company’s selling expense can be determined.

 

Despite Anadolu spending almost three times as much on distribution and marketing, Turk Tuborg has made significant share gains. The company seems to be much more efficient with a much better feel for the desires of Turkish customers. Turk Tuborg’s superior management will be very difficult for Anadolu to overcome. Can Anadolu increase its marketing and distribution expense to win back share? The recent past would suggest increasing spending would not do much good. It is also particularly difficult when the company’s debt load is on the higher side. The restrictions on alcohol promotions and advertisements as well as the restrictions on alcohol producers sponsoring events greatly reduces the ability of increased marketing expenses.

 

Turk Tuborg’s saw its gross profit increase by 34.3% and its gross margin expand by 197 bps. Despite, the company increasing its ASP at an average annual rate of 9.9% since 2008, its gross margin has expanded by over 2675 basis points pointing to pricing power. Over the same period, industry volume declined by 0.9% strengthening the case of pricing power.

 

Administrative expenses increased in line with revenue 27.7% at remaining at roughly 5.0% of sales, while selling expenses increased by 26.0% decreasing slightly as a percentage of sales from 25.5% of sales to 24.7% of sales.

 

Operating profit increased by 44.3% from TRY180.78 million in 2015 to TRY260.85 million in 2016. The company’s working capital is negative at –TRY64 million and fixed capital turnover remained roughly the same at 2.82 times. The company’s capital efficiency declined slightly to 3.47 times. Overall, ROIC decreased slightly from 76.1% to 75.2%.

 

Turk Tuborg continues to perform extremely well growing at a fast pace, taking a significant amount of share, and remaining very profitable with an ROIC of 75.2%.  Given the poor liquidity in the company’s stock and political concerns, Turk Tuborg trades on a NOPAT yield of 7.4% with the potential for continued ASP increases of at least 5% per year leading to expected return of at least 12.5% and potentially more. Our weekly commentary dated 12/13/16-12/19/16, looked at acquisition multiples in the beer industry since 1999 and over the last twelve months. The average transaction multiple was 11.7 times EV/EBITDA and 11.5 times EV/EBITDA, respectively.  Assuming a multiple of 12 times EV/EBITDA, Turk Tuborg has 43% upside.

 

The barriers to entry within the Turkish beer industry are extremely strong, with Turk Tuborg and Anadolu maintaining over 99% of the market for over a decade, eliminating any concerns over competitive risks. Additionally, restrictions on alcohol promotions and advertising reduces the risk of increased competitive rivalry. The company has a net cash position at 1.2 times the company’s 2016 operating profit eliminating potential financial risk. The biggest risk is political as Erdogan consolidates his power in Turkey. The consolidation of power eliminates checks and balances typically seen in democracy and Erdogan’s conservative nature may lead to continued attempt to stifle the industry. The government continues to increase excise taxes in attempt to stamp out drinking. The current consumption tax rate on beer is 63%. In 2013, the Turkish government imposing a series of new alcohol restrictions including banning shops from selling alcohol from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m. and prohibited all forms of advertising and promotion of alcohol. Alcohol producers are also barred from sponsoring events, and television broadcasters were required to blur images of alcohol in movies, soap operas and music videos. In a 2010 survey commissioned by the Health Ministry, Ankara’s Hacettepe University found that only 23% of Turkish men and 4% of Turkish women drank alcohol so there may be a tolerance for prohibition. Turkish annual alcohol consumption is the lowest in Europe at 1.55 liters per capita compared to over 10 liters in most European countries.

 

Despite the company’s strong operating performance, strong competitive position, net cash position, and slightly cheap valuation, growth is bound to slow as ASP increase are the driver of growth with industry volumes declining at 1.0% per year. The increasing consolidation of power by Erdogan is worrisome for the industry leading us to decrease our position size to 2.0% as long as the price is above TRY9.00.

 

 

WEEKLY COMMENTARY 3/6/17- 3/12/17

WEEKLY COMMENTARY               3/6/17- 3/12/17

 

 

CURRENT POSITIONS

 

 

 

COMPANY NEWS

 

A Soriano Corp (Anscor) reported 2016 results. We recently initiated on Anscor with the key points to our thesis being:

 

  • The company has a healthy balance sheet
  • The company was in a number of highly competitive businesses, but
  • The company consistently generated a return on equity (ROE) around 10% our discount rate for all companies.
  • Despite the company’s healthy balance sheet and the consistency of the company’s ROE, Anscor trades well below its book value currently at 0.55 times its tangible book value and at 5.5 times cyclically adjusted earnings.

 

In 2016, the company maintained a healthy balance sheet with total liabilities twice the company’s cash position but less than half the amount of the company’s total securities. While the company’s businesses continue to be competitive, it was able to generate a return on tangible equity of 9.9%.

 

The company’s income before tax increased by 26% driven by strong results in all subsidiaries. Anscor’s largest subsidiary, PDPI grew its revenue by 8.3% due to a strong macroeconomic environment boosting construction activity. It was able to increase its net income by 30.7% in 2016. PDPI generated a ROE of 32%, the second year in a row over 30%. The company’s resort operations increased revenue and gross operating profit by 5.7% and 8.3%, respectively, generating a ROE of 34.0%. Anscor’s US nurse staffing business, Cirrus, grew revenue by 39% and net income by 70%. It generated a ROE of 35.9%.

 

Overall, the results reinforce our investment thesis of a company with a healthy balance sheet consistently generating a ROE close to its discount rate yet trades at a substantial discount to book.

 

 

INTERESTING LINKS

 

 

Explaining a Paradox: Why Good (Bad) Companies can be Bad (Good) Investments! (Musing on Markets)

 

In an environment where finding high quality ideas with any margin of safety is difficult value investors often stray to the idea that any high quality company is worthy of an investment regardless of the company’s valuation as holding cash due to a lack of ideas is more painful than investing in high quality companies that are overvalued. Contrary to what is often heard, Professor Damodaran describes how high quality companies can be bad investments while low quality investments can be good investments. (link)

 

 

Rethinking Conventional Wisdom: Why NOT a Value Bias? (Research Affiliates)

 

This Research Affiliates article is from August 2016 but it reinforces what pretty much any research on value states that it is a investment strategy that consistently outperforms with less volatility.  (link)

 

 

The Emerging Markets Hat Trick: Time to Throw Your Hat In? (Research Affliates)

 

While we are bottom up investors, there are a few top down investors enjoy reading with Research Affiliates being one of them. December 2016 article discusses the attractiveness of Emerging Markets equities. (link)

 

Additionally, we look at Research Affiliates expected returns for different asset classes on occasion. (link) Expected returns are not used in our investment process but we find them interesting nonetheless. We have thought about using the index expected returns as a discount rate. We view the discount rate as an opportunity cost rather than a specific cost of capital for a company. In our view, the marginal cost of capital is for a company does not relate to our acceptable level of return. There are other problems with using the marginal cost of capital as the discount rate including potential estimation errors and biases in the calculation as the marginal cost of capital changes from company to company. Rather than focusing on the marginal cost of capital of a company, we care about generating a sufficient return in each investment idea. Our current thinking is that the return on any investment in the long term equals the return on invested capital as any valuation discount or premium to the intrinsic value is insignificant over longer periods making the average return on invested capital (ROIC) a good starting point for the discount rate. According to McKinsey, from 1963-2004, the average ROIC excluding goodwill was 10%. (link) Triangulating the view that ROIC roughly matches the performance of a business over the long run is the returns of the S&P 500 geometric average from 1928-2016 is 9.53% and 1967 to 2016 is 10.09%, roughly equal to the average ROIC excluding goodwill. (link)

 

The thought of using expected returns of Emerging Markets as the discount rate makes sense as any recommendation or actively managed portfolio should outperform its index in the long run otherwise you are destroying value as an investor can just buy a low cost index of the asset class. The big problem is the expected return is very difficult to forecast accurately. Also, using expected returns leads to intrinsic values moving with the market direction rather than being the ultimate anchor for a value investor. We are using 10% as a discount rate for all investments.

 

 

Return Expectations Going Forward (Ben Carlson)

 

Ben Carlson discusses his views on forward expected returns. (link)

 

 

On the Valuation of the Indian Stock Market (Latticework)

 

Samit Vartak provides his thoughts on the current valuations in the Indian equity market. (link)

 

 

Trusting Management and the Limitations of Research (MicroCapClub)

 

Mike Schellinger writes about the limitations of research and assessing management. (link)

 

 

Where companies with a long-term view outperform their peers (McKinsey)

 

McKinsey studies the performance of companies with a long-term view and find they outperform on many measures. (link) There is a link to the full report at the bottom of the article.

 

 

Between ROIC and a hard place: The puzzle of airline economics (McKinsey)

 

McKinsey analyze the economics of the airline business through a ROIC lense with thoughts on what attributes lead to outperformance. (link)

 

 

Salvation or misleading temptation—low-cost brands of legacy airlines (McKinsey)

 

McKinsey provides a strategy for low cost airline brands under the umbrella of a full service carrier. They also discuss the differences in cost structure between the two. (link)

 

 

The economics underlying airline competition (McKinsey)

 

A short discussion on the difficulties of low cost carriers moving into long haul flights. (link)

 

 

Shipbroking and bunkering (Bruce Packard)

 

Bruce Packard compares two shipbrokers, Clarkson and Braemar. It is an excellent comparative analysis that may be useful in any investor’s process. (link)

A. Soriano Corporation 2/23/17

A. Soriano Corporation

Bloomberg Ticker:                              ANS:PM

Closing Price (2/23/17):          PHP6.34

6 Month Avg. Daily Vol. (USD mn):    0.017

Market Cap (USD mn):           156

Estimated Annualized Return:            18.0%

February 23, 2017

 

A_Soriano_Corp_Feb_23_2017_Final

 

INVESTMENT THESIS

A. Soriano Corporation (Anscor) is a Filipino investment holding company with investments in many different industries. The company has a healthy balance sheet and consistently generates a return on equity around its discount rate. Despite the healthy balance sheet and the consistency of the company’s ROE, Anscor trades well below its book value currently at 0.56 times book and at 5.46 times cyclically adjusted earnings. There is significant upside to the company’s earnings valuation (110% upside) and asset valuation (77% upside). We are taking a 2.0% starting position as the stock is very illiquid.

 

 

COMPANY DESCRIPTION

 

Anscor was incorporated on February 13, 1930. It is an investment holding company located in the Philippines. Anscor’s largest investments are Phelps Dodge International Philippines, Inc. and Seven Seas Resorts and Leisure, Inc. Other investments include Cirrus Medical Staffing, KSA Realty, Prople Limited, and Enderun College among others.

 

 

Phelps Dodge International Philippines

 

Phelps Dodge International Philippines, Inc. (PDIPI) was incorporated in 1955 and started production in 1957. Its products are primarily copper-based wires and cables including building wires, telecommunication cables, power cables, automotive wires and magnet wires. PDIPI has a technical assistance contract with General Cable Company (GCC), the second largest cable company in the world. GCC was also a shareholder in PDIPI until December 2014 when Anscor acquired GCC’s 60% shareholding for PHP3.0 billion. The Philippine wire and cable industry is comprised of both imported and domestically manufactured products. The four largest manufacturers are Phelps Dodge, American Wire and Cable Co., Inc., Columbia Wire and Cable Corp., and Philflex Cable Corp.

 

Over the past three years, PDIPI’s average return on assets of 16% is well above its discount rate pointing to potential barriers to entry within the industry. Despite the strong returns, the industry is fragmented. There are no supply side barriers to entry as copper cables are a relatively simple product to manufacture and there is no favorable access to raw materials as raw materials are commodities that can be purchased from many suppliers. There are no demand side barriers to entry as purchasing copper cables does not create habit and there are no switching costs, search costs, or network effects.  There may be some economies of scale but with gross margin at only 14%, it seems the cost structure of the business is primarily variable eliminating any real barriers to entry from economies of scale.

 

 

Seven Seas Resorts and Leisure

 

Seven Seas Resorts and Leisure, Inc. (SSRL) was incorporated on August 28, to plan, develop, operate and promote Pamalican Island as a world-class resort. The resort is named Amanpulo and started commercial operations on January 1, 1994. SSRL inventory is 103 rooms with 40 original casitas and 63 rooms in villas. SSRL is a joint venture between Anscor, Palawan Holdings, Inc., and Aboitiz & Co with Anscor owning 62% of the resort.

 

The resort’s services are offered through the worldwide Amanresort marketing group based in Singapore, accredited travel agents, reservation sources/systems, and direct selling. Amanpulo is in competition with all other small 5 star resort companies in other destinations that are generally better known than the Philippines, such as Indonesia, Thailand, and Malaysia.

 

According to reviews on Tripadvisors.com, 90% of Amanpulo’s reviews were excellent, the highest rating. It is rated as the #1 hotel in Palawan Province.

 

Until 2015, SSRL failed to earn a reasonable return on assets. The company also failed to generate any meaningful growth with revenue increasing from PHP517 million in 2011 to PHP645 million in 2016. Similar to PDIPI, there does not seem to be any barriers to entry. There are thousands of luxury resorts around the world illustrating the lack of barriers to entry within the industry. There are no supply side advantages in owning a luxury resort. There are no demand side advantages. If there are economies of scale within the industry, SSRL is a smaller resort, which would be disadvantaged.

 

 

Cirrus Medical Staffing, Inc.

 

Cirrus Medical Staffing (Cirrus) is a US-based nurse and physical therapist staffing business. It places registered nurses on contracts of twelve weeks or longer. In January 2008, Anscor acquired Cirrus. Cirrus has a preferred vendor relationship with the US’s largest home health company. Anscor owns 94% of Cirrus.

 

Similar to SSRL, Cirrus did not generate an acceptable on assets until 2015. Unlike SSRL, Cirrus has been growing its business at a rapid pace. Since 2011, service income growing by 16.7% per annum, gross profit grew by 21.3% per year, and EBITDA grew by 90% per year.

 

The nurse and physical staffing business is very fragmented and there are no supply side advantages. Potentially, there are demand side advantages in the form of switching costs. When using a staffing agency for a large number of employees as long as the staffing agent is doing a good job, the client should continue to use the agent and the agent has a bit of pricing power due to the cost of switching providers. The client can easily offset the staffing agent’s bargaining power by using multiple providers. For small clients, it seems like the potential for a demand side advantage is much smaller as it is easier to find the necessary supply of labor.  Economies of scale do not exist in the industry.

 

 

KSA Realty Corporation

 

Anscor exchanged its old building located at acquired a 11.42% stake in KSA Realty Corporation (KSA) 1990 in exchange for Paseo de Roxas in Makati. KSA develop The Enterprise Center, a two tower, grade A office building located in Makati.

 

In 2015, KSA had an occupancy rate of 96%, generating PHP992 million in revenue, and PHP1,300 million in net income including a PHP517 million revaluation gain. Despite a decrease in the occupancy rate from 2013, KSA was able to increase revenue by 20% over the past two years. KSA’s assets have been revalued twice in the past three years. There are no competitive advantages in the property business.

 

 

Enderun Colleges, Inc.

 

In October 2008, Anscor acquired 20% equity stake in Enderun Colleges, Inc. Enderun was established in 2005 by a group of business leaders, including senior executives from Hyatt Corporation in the U.S., Enderun offers a full range of bachelor’s degree and non-degree courses in hospitality management, culinary arts, and business. Enderun has close to 1,200 full time and certificate students spread almost evenly across the school’s three main degree offerings.

 

Enderun recently launched Enderun Extension, a continuing education unit that is the college’s language training and tutorial business. In 2014, Enderun launched a hotel and management consultancy unit. Several hotels and resorts are under Enderun’s management.

 

Management expects Enderun to deliver double-digit growth in the coming years.

 

Within education, there is a brand advantage at the very elite schools but Enderun does not have that advantages.

 

 

Prople Limited

 

In December 2007, Anscor acquired 20% of Prople for US$800,000. In November 2013 acquired 100% of the non-audit business of US-based Kellogg and Andelson Accountancy Corporation (K&A). Founded in 1939, K&A is a well- established accounting firm that provides tax, general accounting, and consulting services to thousands of small to medium sized companies in California and the Midwest. It operates out of five locations in Los Angeles, Woodland Hills, San Diego, Kansas City and Chennai (India). Following its acquisition of K&A, Prople now employs 373 people serving over 5,500 clients from operations located in six cities worldwide. In 2015, Prople closed K&A’s San Diego office and client attrition in the Midwest. Prior to the acquisition of K&A, Prople’s services included business process outsourcing, knowledge process outsourcing, and content services. K&A tripled the company’s revenue.

 

With the acquisition of K&A, Prople is primarily a tax, accounting, and consulting provider. Professional services, like tax and accounting, have some switching costs as the provider is embedded in the company’s operations becoming an integral part of the team. Despite the switching costs, the industry is fragmented and bargaining power of the provider can be decreased by using multiple suppliers.

 

 

AGP International Holdings Ltd.

 

AGP International (AG&P) is Southeast Asia’s leading modular fabricator of refinery and petrochemical plants, power plants, liquid natural gas facilities, mining processing, offshore platforms, and other infrastructure. AG&P has 110 years of experience serving clients like British Petroleum, Shell and Total.

 

Anscor made its first investment in AG&P in December 2011. In June 2013, Anscor subscribed to 83.9 million series C, voting preferred shares in AG&P. Series B and Series C preferred shares are convertible at the option of the holder, into class A common shares. The subscription increased Anscor’s holdings to 27%.

 

Similar to cable manufacturing there are no barriers to entry within the modular fabrication.

 

Anscor’s businesses do not appear to be competitively advantaged. The lack of barriers to entry makes industry analysis irrelevant.

 

Listed above is the company’s shareholder structure. 50.7% of the shares issued are held by a 100% owned subsidiary. Insiders own another 27.1% of shares issued, affiliates own 3.2% of shares issued, and the public own 19.0% of shares issued.

 

 

VALUATION

 

The lack of barriers to entry within Anscor’s businesses and the management team is deeply entrenched the company’s earnings power is the best method of measuring the company’s value as the earnings generated are likely to continue. Assuming average management and a lack of barriers to entry means the value of the company’s assets should be close to the company’s earnings valuation as excess returns are unlikely and cyclical adjusted earnings should be close to the company’s discount rate.

 

Given the company’s large investments in securities and associates, we use net income as the best measure of the company’s earnings and equity as the best measure of investment capital. Since 2010, Anscor has generated an average net income of PHP1,423 on an average tangible equity of PHP12,106 equating to a roughly 11.8% return on equity.

 

Given the lack of barriers to entry in Anscor’s businesses, growth does not create value and therefore is irrelevant; therefore, assuming a 10% discount rate Anscor should be trading at roughly 1.18 times tangible book value representing a 110% upside.

 

Anscor is trading on a cyclically adjusted PE of 5.46 times meaning in the absence of growth, the company’s expected annualized return in 18.3%.

 

Given the company’s ability to generate a consistent return on equity equal to the company’s discount rate, the reproduction value of the company’s assets should equal the company’s tangible book value. It is difficult to say a collection of assets are impaired if they generate a return equal to the discount rate.

 

Anscor’s fair value is between tangible book (77% upside) and 1.18 times tangible book (110% upside).

 

 

RISKS

 

A company with a dominant shareholder (A. Soriano III) brings potential corporate governance issues. Anscor only material related party transactions are key management remuneration, which averaged 8.8% of net income over the past five years. Key management remuneration is a little high but the absence of any other related party transactions and the cheap valuations means it can be overlooked.

 

Our goal with assessing macro risk is not to forecast the path of macroeconomic indicators but to eliminate risks from a poor macroeconomic position. Anscor’s business is primarily in the Philippines, a country that seems to be in very good financial health. In 2015, the country’s current account was 2.6% of GDP and its structural balance was 0.18% of GDP allowing the country to self-finance all the domestic initiatives as well as decrease the country’s debt load. The country does not have too much credit in the system with domestic credit provided by the financial sector at 59.1% at the end of 2015, which is well below the Emerging Markets average of 97.5% and the High Income countries average of 205%. Gross government debt as a percentage of GDP stood just under 35% with External Debt to GDP at 36%. The one concerning macroeconomic indicator is the level of growth in credit in the Philippines. Over the past five years, the amount of domestic credit provided by the financial sector has increased at a rate 12% per annum. When a country is growing its banking assets at this pace, there is a high probability of an increase in non-performing loans. The country’s banking system has a healthy capital balance with capital to assets at 10.6%.

 

The investment is based on Anscor’s strong financially health. If the company were to leverage its balance sheet, the attractiveness of the investment opportunity would decline.

 

The investment is also based on Anscor’s consistently generating net income around its cost of capital. If earnings in the business were to permanently decline, the investment would become much less attractive.

 

If earnings were to decline making a liquidation value a more appropriate valuation methodology, there is still 30% upside meaning there is significant downside protection.

 

If Anscor were to make expensive acquisitions, it would decrease the returns in the business through the write down of income and equity.

 

Given the nature of Anscor’s businesses, they all lack barriers to entry and therefore are at risk of increased supply depressing profitability.

 

Most of Anscor’s businesses are cyclical in nature and subject to macroeconomic risks.

 

At the end of Q3 2016, 47% of Anscor’s assets were in available for sale securities or fair value through the profit and loss investments making the company exposed to the fluctuations of the Philippines Stock Exchange.

WEEKLY COMMENTARY 2/13/17- 2/19/17

WEEKLY COMMENTARY               2/13/17- 2/19/17

 

 

CURRENT POSITIONS

 

 

 

COMPANY NEWS

 

PC Jeweller report Q3 FY17 results over the past week. Demonetization impacted the quarter’s results with the company estimating sales were affected for three to four weeks. Post-demonetization, sales started improving in December and returned to normal in January. Gross margin were stable but the decline is sales resulted in a decline in profitability. Year on year sales declined by 3.4%, the number of showrooms grew from 58 in FQ3 2016 to 68 FQ3 2017, or 17%, and total square feet increased by 8% year on year from 346,855 square feet to 374,481 square feet. Year on year, the company’s operating profit declined 13.7%. Assuming during the four weeks that demonetization affected sales there was a 50% decreased in sales, no impact from demonetization would have lead to an increase in sales by roughly 16% year on year.

 

It is tough to tell how good or bad the quarter was due to demonetization. The company continues to increase its showroom footprint and sales barely declined despite demonetization. The company estimates 75% of the jewelry industry is unorganized dampening competitive pressures.

 

PC Jeweller is one of the most profitable and fastest growing companies in the Indian jewelry industry illustrating the strength of the company’s management and focus on efficiency. Management is one of the most innovative in the industry with many initiatives not seen in the industry. The company is trying to double its showroom footprint over the next five years. Despite the company’s strengths, it trades on an EV/NOPAT of 14 times and an EV/IC of 2.6 times. We will maintain our current position size.

 

In the past week, Grendene reported Q4 2016 and full year results. For the full year 2016, net sales declined by 7.2% with domestic sales falling by 1.6% and export sales falling by 16.3%.

 

Overall volume declined by 9.3% with domestic volume declining by 8.0% and export volumes falling by 13.0%.

 

ASP increased by 4.1% with domestic ASP increasing by 7.2% and export ASP falling by 3.2%. Gross profit fell by 6.7% as cost of goods sold declined by 7.6%.

 

Operating profit declined by in 7.5%. The company’s capital intensity did not change over the year with working capital at 47.9% of sales, fixed capital at 18.9% of sales, and invested capital at 66.8% of sales.

 

Grendene’s key value drivers are illustrated above. In 2016, gross margin reached a peak level of 48.7%. Selling expenses remain near its historical average relative to sales at 24.0%. General and administrative is at its peak at 4.8% of sales. EBIT margin remained at its historical peak of 20.0%. Working capital remains slightly elevated relative to historical averages. Fixed capital as a percentage is at its highest level over the past eleven years.

 

Grendene continues to struggle with economic weakness in Brazil and in export markets. The company operational efficiency allows the company to maintain its profitability during a period of declining revenue. In 2015, the company reiterated its growth targets of revenue growth of 8-12% and net income growth of 12-15%. The company continues to believe these targets are achievable but acknowledge risks of not achieving these results are increasing due to economic weakness in Brazil and in exports markets.

 

Given the new data, we update Grendene’s earnings valuation range. Grendene illustrated its ability to maintain profitability despite a period of declining revenues and increasing competitive pressures making earnings valuation the most appropriate valuation methodology.

 

Looking at Grendene’s earnings valuation, the company reaches our target return of 15% per year under the most optimistic scenarios. We would assume perpetuity growth only under scenarios when the company operates in an industry with barriers to entry and pricing power. Within the domestic market, there are clear barriers to entry with the company and its main competitor Alpargatas having economies of scale as they occupy over 50% of the market with large fixed costs in the form of distribution and advertising. Grendene also has unique capabilities in manufacturing plastic products as it modifies its own machines and can formulate plastics that are unavailable to other footwear producers. These barriers to entry do not transfer outside of Brazil. The company is a low cost producer with only China producing exports at a lower price.

 

The question is whether the barriers to entry within Brazil translate to pricing power. The barriers to entry within the segment means very few other players could sell products at the Grendene’s and Alpargatas’ price range meaning the company’s probably do have some pricing power in Brazil. Over the past ten years, the company average selling price increased by 3.8% per annum with the domestic selling price increasing by 2.6% and export selling pricing increasing by 3.9% in USD terms so there is a strong argument for potential pricing power. We assume 2.5% pricing power in our base case scenario. The company sales have grown at 6.8% over the past ten years with growth stagnating at 4.9% over the past five years. Assuming an inability to growth operating profit above sales growth a 5% growth rate seems appropriate for our five-year forecast period. Despite the company’s ability to maintain profitability during the recent industry weakness using peak margins seems aggressive therefore average margins are more appropriate. Our base case scenario is 5% forecast period growth, 2.5% terminal growth and average operating margins leading an upside to the 2021 fair value of 60% or 9.9% annualized return. Overall, the average return over the next five years under the earnings valuation is 59% or 9.7%.

 

 

INTERESTING LINKS

 

 

How much is growth worth? (Musing on Markets)

 

Professor Damodaran breakdowns how to value growth, the key drivers of growth, and the importance of ROIC in determing whether growth is valuable or not. (link)

 

 

Narrative and Numbers: How a number cruncher learned to tell stories! (Musing on Markets)

 

Another post by Professor Damodaran explaining how narratives can be worked into your valuation to provide a better picture of how the market is valuing a company. (link) Professor Damodaran recently published a book Narrative and Numbers, which I have not read but is next on my list.

 

 

Diversification..again.. (Oddball Stocks)

 

Nate Tobik of Oddball Stocks shares his thoughts on diversification. (link) Our current thoughts on diversification and position sizing can be viewed here. (link) We have a similar thought process on the limits of one’s knowledge as an outside investor with valuation being the biggest tool to offset the limits of our knowledge.

 

 

Humility and knowledge (Oddball Stocks)

 

Related to his post on diversification, Mr. Tobik discusses how investors sometimes make the mistake of believing they know too much. (link)  We touched on a similar topic in our diversification post linked above.

 

 

Graham & Doddsville (Columbia Business School)

 

Columbia Business School put out another edition of Graham & Doddsville, which always makes for interesting reading. (link)

 

 

Buffett’s Three Categories of Returns on Capital (Base Hit Investing)

 

Base Hit Investing’s John Huber talks about how Buffett categorizes business by their return on capital and capital requirements. (link)

 

 

What Does Nevada’s $35 Billion Fund Manager Do All Day? Nothing (Wall Street Journal)

 

The Wall Street Journal profiles the Steve Edmundson, the investment chief for the Nevada Public Employees’ Retirement. (link)

 

 

Howard Marks’ Letters Sorted by Topic (Anil Kumar Tulsiram)

 

Anil Kumar Tulsiram complied all Howard Marks’ letters by topic. He has compiled other documents in the past and can be followed on Twitter @Anil_Tulsiram. (link)