Tag Archives: Investment Idea

Turk Tuborg & GMA Holding Position Sizes 11/6/2017

Turk Tuborg & GMA Holding Position Size 11/6/2017

 

Turk Tuborg’s position decreased 5.1% on May 12, 2017 when there was the first sales with a goal of reaching 2.0%.  The share price has increased and the stock is illiquid. The current position is 3.2%. There will be no further selling.

There is a similar liquidity issue with GMA Holding.  There will be no more buying and the GMA Holding position.  It is a 6.4% position.

Both are high quality companies that can be held for five years regardless of stock market liquidity.

The latest recommendation size of 6.0% was completed over 7 days.

Future recommendations will be in more liquid stocks. The lower limit for 6 month average daily volume will be USD100,000 in the most attractive of situations but more likely it will be above USD250,000 average daily volume.

 

 

 

New Research Report October 19, 2017

I have produced a new research report on a very liquid high quality retailer with seems to have a few competitive advantages and offers a 16.3% expected return using conservative assumptions. It will start with a 6% position size in our model portfolio.  If you are interested in the report please contact me at marcmelendez@reperiocapital.com

Grendene Q1 2017 Results Review May 8 2017

Grendene Q1 2017 Results Review May 8 2017

Grendene recently reported its Q1 2017 results.  Net revenue grew by 7.2% as domestic revenue grew 23.6%, export revenue declined by 19.1%, and sales taxes and deductions increased by 22%. With regard to pricing, net ASP fell by 1.1% and volume increased by 8.5%. Within Brazil, domestic ASP increased by 7.0% and volume increased by 13.0%. In export markets, ASP declined by 19.8% in BRL terms and 0.3% in USD.  In Q1 2017 Brazil was clearly much stronger than export markets.

 

The table above illustrates total volume, ASP, domestic market volume, domestic ASP, export volume, export ASP in BRL, and export ASP in USD. The company seems to have significant seasonality.

 

In volume terms, Q1 is typically an average quarter overall but it is a weak quarter in the domestic market and a stronger quarter in the export markets. Q1 2017 volume was weak overall relative to the average Q1 volume with domestic volume slightly above the average Q1 volume and export volume well below the typical Q1 volume.

 

The chart above illustrates volume over the trailing twelve months (TTM) for the domestic, export, and a combination of the two (overall). TTM volumes peaked for Grendene in Q4 2013 and fell by 7.7% per annum overall with both domestic and export markets declining by the roughly the same amount.

 

In ASP terms, there is a lot less seasonality with prices consistently increasing in both domestic and export markets at a rate of 2.9% in the domestic market and 3.8% in USD terms in export markets. The ability to raise prices in both domestic and export markets despite a falling volumes and a weak overall macro environment may be a good sign of the company’s pricing power. The company may also be stretching its ability to raise prices as the company sells lower cost shoes that may not provide as much value to customers at higher prices.

 

Grendene’s gross profit grew by 11.0% in Q1 2017 with its gross margin expanding by 59 basis points (bps) over Q1 2016 and 37 bps over Q4 2016. The gross margin expansion over Q1 2016 was driven primarily by a decrease in cost of goods sold per pair as the ASP decreased from BRL13.63 to BRL13.47. Cost of goods sold per pair decreased from BRL7.25 in Q1 2016 to BRL6.95 in Q1 2017. The driver was a decrease in personnel expense.

 

 

Along with higher prices during periods of weak demand, the company’s ability to increase consistently its gross margin points to pricing power.

 

Selling expenses increased by 2.2% year on year, while administrative expenses decreased by 11.7% leading to an increase in operating profit by 28.9%. The company’s continues to maintain a focus on operational efficiency.

 

The company’s increased volume and decreased costs led to a 28.9% increase in operating profit. Grendene’s working capital increased by 2.9% year on year, while PP&E increased by 4.3%.

 

Our initial investment thesis for Grendene was a company that built multiple competitive advantages in the domestic market. Within the domestic market, it is a low cost operator with scale advantage due to heavy investments in advertising, product development, automation, and process improvements. It produces a low priced experienced good and has built a strong brand allowing for pricing power. Grendene’s exports are at the low end of the cost curve ensuring the company stays competitive in export markets. The company is run by owner operators with strong operational skills and an understanding of its competitive position who treat all stakeholders with respect. It also has consistently generated stable, excess profit even during periods of industry stress and has a net cash balance sheet.
We believe the quality of the business remains but the valuation is no longer as cheap as it once was. At the time of our initial recommendation, valuations were attractive with the company trading on a NOPAT yield of 10.1%, a FCF yield of 8.5%, an EV/IC of 1.6 times. Grendene is now trading at a NOPAT yield of 6.7%, a FCF yield of 6.7% and an EV/IC of 5.0 times at a time of elevated profitability.  If we were to normalize margins, Grendene would be trading at a NOPAT yield of 5.3% and a FCF yield of 5.5% making a 5% growth rate into perpetuity necessary for a double-digit return.

 

The company‘s margin of safety has been eliminated leading us to sell our position and no longer cover Grendene. We will continue to follow its developments, in case valuation become more attractive.

 

Stalexport Autostrady SA 3/11/2017

Stalexport Autostrady SA 

Bloomberg Ticker:                               STX:PW

Closing Price (3/10/17):                       PLN4.30

6 Month Avg. Daily Vol. (USD mn):    0.13

Market Cap (USD mn):                        262

Estimated Annualized Return:           10.5%

March 11, 2017

Stalexport_Autostrady_Final_March_11_2017

 

INVESTMENT THESIS

 

Stalexport Autostrady holds a concession on a 61-kilometer stretch of the A4 in Poland between Katowice and Kraków. The concession ends in 2027. The company’s management has done an excellent job of improving operations since taking over in 2006 growing toll revenue at 11.8% over the past ten years. Despite the growth in the business, and inherent operating leverage in running a toll motorway, the current market valuation is 19% below a zero growth intrinsic value making Stalexport an attractive investment opportunity. If the company is able to grow revenues at half of its historic rate, there is 67% upside to its intrinsic value. If the company is able to continue to grow its revenues at its historic rate, there is 131% upside. Given the stability of the company’s revenue and the expected return of 10.5%, we recommend a starting position of 2.0%.

 

 

COMPANY DESCRIPTION

 

 

History

 

Stalexport Autostrady started operations on January 1, 1963 as Przedsiębiorstwo Handlu Zagranicznego “Stalexport”. It specialized in exporting and importing steel products as well as importing raw materials for the Polish steel industry. In 1993, the Polish government privatized the company with shares listing on the Warsaw Stock Exchange in October 26, 1994. In 1997, Stalexport won a 30-year concession to construct, adapt, and operate a 61 km toll road on the A4 motorway between Katowice and Kraków.

 

The motorway was secondary to the steel business until 2006, when the Atlantia Group, then Autostrade S.p.A., an Italian infrastructure company, acquired 50%+1 share of Stalexport for €67 million or PLN200 million. By Polish regulation, Atlantia was forced to launch a public tender offer for up to 66% of Stalexport’s share capital. It increased its share to 56.24% at the time of the acquisition. To complete the acquisition, Atlantia required Stalexport to increase its share capital with all new shares going directly to Atlantia. It also mandated the sale of the steel business. Prior to obtaining Atlantia as a strategic investor, Stalexport was dealing with potential bankruptcy for a number of years with its auditor, BDO, issuing a statement of the going concern nature of the company in its opinion statement. Atlantia manages a network of 5,000 km of toll motorways in Italy, Brazil, Chile, India, and Poland. It is a leader with respect to automatic motorway toll collections systems.

 

In 2011, Stalexport reduced its share capital to PLN185.45 million to reflect the change of the of the organization and capital requirements as the company was solely an operator of a toll road.

 

Since the acquisition, Atlantia increased its shareholding to 61.20%. Post-acquisition, its first increase came in to 2011 with a purchase of 10.86 million shares increasing its stake to 60.63%. In 2016, the company purchased another 1.4 million shares increasing its stake to 61.20%. Management has an insignificant shareholding with Emil Wasacz, President of the Management Board, holding 59,000 shares.

 

 

Organizational Structure

 

Stalexport Autostrady S.A. focuses on the upgrade and expansion of motorway infrastructure. In 1997, it was the first Polish company to be granted a concession to operation, upgrade, and maintain a toll motorway wining the concession on the A4 motorway between Katowice and Kraków section. In 2004, the concession was transferred to Stalexport Autostrada Małopolska S.A.

 

Stalexport Autoroute S.à r.l. was establish on December 30, 2005. The entity does not conduct any operational activities apart from holding shares in SAM as well as in VIA4. The entity was established as a prerequisite to obtain a loan for a consortium of banks.

 

Stalexport Autostrada Małopolska S.A. (SAM) SAM was established on December 19, 1997 as a special purpose vehicle to manage the A4 motorway between Katowice and Kraków. The motorway concession was transferred to from the group to SAM on July 28, 2004. After the transfer, SAM was authorized to collect lease fees and tolls for using the above-mentioned motorway section. As stated by the concession agreement, the entity is obliged to provide ongoing maintenance of the motorway and continue other necessary investment tasks.

 

VIA4 (formerly Stalexport Transroute Autostrada S.A.) was established on 14 May 1998. VIA4’s only customer is SAM. Its main tasks are ongoing operation and maintenance of the A4 toll motorway section, which includes operation of the toll collection system, management of motorway traffic, and comprehensive renovation and maintenance of the motorway. VIA4 also carries out tasks related to safety and road traffic. VIA4 is 55% owned by Stalexport and 45% owned by Egis Road Operation S.A., a French company with expertise in all of aspects of motorway management.

 

Biuro Centrum was established on June 9, 1994. The main business of Biuro Centrum consists in management and maintenance of the office and conference building in Katowice at ul. Mickiewicza 29 co-owned by Stalexport Autostrady (40.47%) and Węglokoks S.A. (59.53%).

 

98% of the consolidated company’s revenues and 96% of EBIT are from SAM, the entity that collects the lease fees and tolls from the motorway.

 

Given the importance of the toll road, we focus our attention on this business. The A4 toll motorway between Katowice and Kraków is 61-kilometer toll road. It is part of the A4, which is one of the major motorways in Poland and one of the two motorways planned to stretch from the eastern border Poland to the western border of Poland by 2022 along with the A2 in central Poland.

 

The A4 from Katowice to Kraków is an open system, where money is paid at tollbooths stretching across the road based on the vehicle type. The open system is relative cheap but forces commuters to stop at each tollbooth decreasing the capacity of the motorway. The other system is a closed system where there are tolls at each interchange when entering and exiting the motorway the toll is paid based on the vehicle and the distance traveled.

 

According to Google Map driving directions, the A4 is the quickest way from Katowice to Kraków beating the 94 by 28 minutes. As mentioned, the only major competition to cross Poland is the A2 in central Poland. The decision is based on your starting and ending point and the quickest route of travel so in many instances there is no competition. The A4 is a fastest way to travel particularly if you are driving across southern Poland from east to west or west to east and there are very few alternatives. It would be very difficult for a competing toll road to be built over the next 10 years allowing the A4 to generate steady revenue with very little investment requirements. Additionally, if another road were to be built to compete with the A4, it would cannibalize government revenue, as the A4 from Katowice to Kraków will be handed over to the government at the end of the concession in 2027. Toll roads also have barriers to entry in the form of habitual behavior. When commuters have a road travelled on a daily basis a habit is formed as the road is travelled without any thought creating a habit that is difficult to break.

 

For the consolidated entity, since 2008, toll revenue increased by 11.6% per year with passenger vehicle toll revenue increasing by 11.4% per year and heavy goods vehicle toll revenue increasing by 11.9% per year. Average daily traffic increased by 4.5% per year with passenger vehicle traffic increasing by 5.7% per year and heavy goods traffic decreasing by 0.6% per year. The average toll increased by 6.8% per year with the average toll for passenger vehicles increasing at 5.4% per and heavy goods vehicles increasing by 12.5% per year.

 

Despite the growth in revenues, Stalexport’s cost of goods sold have decreased from PLN85 million in 2006 to PLN37 million in 2016. 2006 and 2012 were the two years with the highest cost of goods sold at PLN85 million. Cost of goods sold is very dependent on road works during the year, which creates a bit of lumpiness and no correlation with revenues. 2016 saw lower road works leading to much lower cost of goods sold. Since 2006, cost of goods sold averaged PLN66 million.

 

Administrative expenses increased steadily from PLN21 million in 2016 to PLN30 million in 2016, equal to a 3.8% annual increase, well below the rate of change in toll revenue.

 

Atlantia has done a good job of growing revenues while decreasing expenses as a percentage of revenues. The biggest driver of decreasing costs relative to expenses was eliminating inefficiencies from having too many subsidiaries.

 

The A4 concession expires in 2027. Upon expiry, the A4 will be transferred to Poland’s Treasury. If Stalexport is to grow, it will come from the existing asset. There are other potential PPP projects but it would be speculative to assume any growth from these projects as the company has not indicated there are any potential projects in the pipeline. The company has also been selective in the past and passed on projects where prospective returns were not attractive enough.

 

Internal growth will come from traffic growth and growth in the average toll. In 2016, Stalexport implemented its own A4Go on-board units after not being able to coordinate with the viaToll system used elsewhere in Poland. The A4Go unit allows for electronic payment at the tolls decrease traffic at tollbooths. The A4Go was implemented in only 6 months and went online in July 2016. By the end of the year, roughly 10% of morning traffic used the A4Go system. The decrease in traffic at tollbooths decreases the travel time for commuters making the A4 a more attractive route for existing and potential users.

 

 

VALUATION

 

Given the barriers to entry and the predictability of revenue, we value Stalexport using a DCF until 2026 the year before the company has to hand operations back to the treasury. We assume no cash flows in 2027 for conservatism.

 

We vary sales growth to get an estimated intrinsic value under different scenarios. Under the most conservative scenario, we assume no growth in sales. Sales growth is then assumed to increase by 3% as scenarios become more aggressive and we reach the most aggressive scenario of 12%, which assumes sales growth will continue at roughly the pace it has over the past ten years (11.8%).

 

The last ten years saw significant variability in the cost of goods sold but the variability was within a well-defined range. We assume an average of the last ten years with no inflation.

 

Administrative expenses have increased steadily over the past 10 years at a rate of 3.8% per year. We assume administrative expenses continue increasing at 4.0% per year. We also assume a tax rate of 20% roughly in-line with the effective tax rate of 19.8% over the past ten years.

 

Since 2008, the company’s average change in working capital to revenue rate is 6.3% meaning every zloty of revenue generates 6.3 grosz of positive free cash flow due to negative working capital requirements. Despite the negative working capital generating free cash flow, we assume there is no cash flow generated from working capital and there are no investments in working capital.

 

Also since 2008, the company has spent 26.1 grosz on capital expenditures for every 1 zloty of revenue just above the depreciation rate of 19.1 grosz for every 1 zloty of revenue. Over the past four years, the capex to depreciation rate averaged 0.8 meaning the company is spending less on capex than depreciation. The recent trend of capex below depreciation leads us to assume capex equals depreciation therefore there are no additional fixed capital requirements other than the maintenance capex.

 

The company has a net cash position just over PLN315 million and a share in property investments with an estimated value of PLN10 million.

 

We place a probability on each of the 5 revenue growth scenarios to a get a blended intrinsic value of PLN7.21 per share, which has 67.6% upside from the current price.

 

 

Under the most conservative scenario of zero revenue growth still leads to an upside of 19% illustrating the downside protection at current prices.

 

 

RISKS

 

Stalexport’s biggest risk is regulatory risk. While a toll motorway concession is a contract, the authorities are most likely least concerned with the owner of the toll motorway and more concerned with other stakeholders such as commuters. In Poland, Stalexport was sued by the Polish government for anti-competitive practices due to high toll rates. In 2008, the company had to pay a PLN1.5 million fine. In India, populism led to abolition of tolls for an extended period. Countries may also change their previous position to void contracts.

 

Any new motorway running parallel to the A4 would create additional supply impacting Stalexport’s ability to attract traffic and raise toll rates.

 

Traffic particularly heavy goods vehicles is dependent on economic growth. Slowing macroeconomic growth could hurt traffic growth.

 

The company has more related party transactions than what we would like and there is potential for some corporate governance risks. The main related party transactions are with companies owned by Atlantia, which complete roadworks on the motorway.

 

Management remuneration has decreased substantially as a percentage of operating income. Management may increase its salaries and extract greater value in the future.

 

There is a risk of the company tendering for new concession and overpaying hurting returns on future projects. The company was disciplined enough to pass on past projects that did not meet the parameters needed for attractive returns.

A. Soriano Corporation Shareholder Structure Correction 2/24/2017

A. Soriano Corporation Shareholder Structure Correction 2/24/2017

There was an error in the shareholder structure table in Anscor initiation.  The total outstanding shares was incorrect.  The corrected table is below.  We also corrected the table in the initial post.

A. Soriano Corporation 2/23/17

A. Soriano Corporation

Bloomberg Ticker:                              ANS:PM

Closing Price (2/23/17):          PHP6.34

6 Month Avg. Daily Vol. (USD mn):    0.017

Market Cap (USD mn):           156

Estimated Annualized Return:            18.0%

February 23, 2017

 

A_Soriano_Corp_Feb_23_2017_Final

 

INVESTMENT THESIS

A. Soriano Corporation (Anscor) is a Filipino investment holding company with investments in many different industries. The company has a healthy balance sheet and consistently generates a return on equity around its discount rate. Despite the healthy balance sheet and the consistency of the company’s ROE, Anscor trades well below its book value currently at 0.56 times book and at 5.46 times cyclically adjusted earnings. There is significant upside to the company’s earnings valuation (110% upside) and asset valuation (77% upside). We are taking a 2.0% starting position as the stock is very illiquid.

 

 

COMPANY DESCRIPTION

 

Anscor was incorporated on February 13, 1930. It is an investment holding company located in the Philippines. Anscor’s largest investments are Phelps Dodge International Philippines, Inc. and Seven Seas Resorts and Leisure, Inc. Other investments include Cirrus Medical Staffing, KSA Realty, Prople Limited, and Enderun College among others.

 

 

Phelps Dodge International Philippines

 

Phelps Dodge International Philippines, Inc. (PDIPI) was incorporated in 1955 and started production in 1957. Its products are primarily copper-based wires and cables including building wires, telecommunication cables, power cables, automotive wires and magnet wires. PDIPI has a technical assistance contract with General Cable Company (GCC), the second largest cable company in the world. GCC was also a shareholder in PDIPI until December 2014 when Anscor acquired GCC’s 60% shareholding for PHP3.0 billion. The Philippine wire and cable industry is comprised of both imported and domestically manufactured products. The four largest manufacturers are Phelps Dodge, American Wire and Cable Co., Inc., Columbia Wire and Cable Corp., and Philflex Cable Corp.

 

Over the past three years, PDIPI’s average return on assets of 16% is well above its discount rate pointing to potential barriers to entry within the industry. Despite the strong returns, the industry is fragmented. There are no supply side barriers to entry as copper cables are a relatively simple product to manufacture and there is no favorable access to raw materials as raw materials are commodities that can be purchased from many suppliers. There are no demand side barriers to entry as purchasing copper cables does not create habit and there are no switching costs, search costs, or network effects.  There may be some economies of scale but with gross margin at only 14%, it seems the cost structure of the business is primarily variable eliminating any real barriers to entry from economies of scale.

 

 

Seven Seas Resorts and Leisure

 

Seven Seas Resorts and Leisure, Inc. (SSRL) was incorporated on August 28, to plan, develop, operate and promote Pamalican Island as a world-class resort. The resort is named Amanpulo and started commercial operations on January 1, 1994. SSRL inventory is 103 rooms with 40 original casitas and 63 rooms in villas. SSRL is a joint venture between Anscor, Palawan Holdings, Inc., and Aboitiz & Co with Anscor owning 62% of the resort.

 

The resort’s services are offered through the worldwide Amanresort marketing group based in Singapore, accredited travel agents, reservation sources/systems, and direct selling. Amanpulo is in competition with all other small 5 star resort companies in other destinations that are generally better known than the Philippines, such as Indonesia, Thailand, and Malaysia.

 

According to reviews on Tripadvisors.com, 90% of Amanpulo’s reviews were excellent, the highest rating. It is rated as the #1 hotel in Palawan Province.

 

Until 2015, SSRL failed to earn a reasonable return on assets. The company also failed to generate any meaningful growth with revenue increasing from PHP517 million in 2011 to PHP645 million in 2016. Similar to PDIPI, there does not seem to be any barriers to entry. There are thousands of luxury resorts around the world illustrating the lack of barriers to entry within the industry. There are no supply side advantages in owning a luxury resort. There are no demand side advantages. If there are economies of scale within the industry, SSRL is a smaller resort, which would be disadvantaged.

 

 

Cirrus Medical Staffing, Inc.

 

Cirrus Medical Staffing (Cirrus) is a US-based nurse and physical therapist staffing business. It places registered nurses on contracts of twelve weeks or longer. In January 2008, Anscor acquired Cirrus. Cirrus has a preferred vendor relationship with the US’s largest home health company. Anscor owns 94% of Cirrus.

 

Similar to SSRL, Cirrus did not generate an acceptable on assets until 2015. Unlike SSRL, Cirrus has been growing its business at a rapid pace. Since 2011, service income growing by 16.7% per annum, gross profit grew by 21.3% per year, and EBITDA grew by 90% per year.

 

The nurse and physical staffing business is very fragmented and there are no supply side advantages. Potentially, there are demand side advantages in the form of switching costs. When using a staffing agency for a large number of employees as long as the staffing agent is doing a good job, the client should continue to use the agent and the agent has a bit of pricing power due to the cost of switching providers. The client can easily offset the staffing agent’s bargaining power by using multiple providers. For small clients, it seems like the potential for a demand side advantage is much smaller as it is easier to find the necessary supply of labor.  Economies of scale do not exist in the industry.

 

 

KSA Realty Corporation

 

Anscor exchanged its old building located at acquired a 11.42% stake in KSA Realty Corporation (KSA) 1990 in exchange for Paseo de Roxas in Makati. KSA develop The Enterprise Center, a two tower, grade A office building located in Makati.

 

In 2015, KSA had an occupancy rate of 96%, generating PHP992 million in revenue, and PHP1,300 million in net income including a PHP517 million revaluation gain. Despite a decrease in the occupancy rate from 2013, KSA was able to increase revenue by 20% over the past two years. KSA’s assets have been revalued twice in the past three years. There are no competitive advantages in the property business.

 

 

Enderun Colleges, Inc.

 

In October 2008, Anscor acquired 20% equity stake in Enderun Colleges, Inc. Enderun was established in 2005 by a group of business leaders, including senior executives from Hyatt Corporation in the U.S., Enderun offers a full range of bachelor’s degree and non-degree courses in hospitality management, culinary arts, and business. Enderun has close to 1,200 full time and certificate students spread almost evenly across the school’s three main degree offerings.

 

Enderun recently launched Enderun Extension, a continuing education unit that is the college’s language training and tutorial business. In 2014, Enderun launched a hotel and management consultancy unit. Several hotels and resorts are under Enderun’s management.

 

Management expects Enderun to deliver double-digit growth in the coming years.

 

Within education, there is a brand advantage at the very elite schools but Enderun does not have that advantages.

 

 

Prople Limited

 

In December 2007, Anscor acquired 20% of Prople for US$800,000. In November 2013 acquired 100% of the non-audit business of US-based Kellogg and Andelson Accountancy Corporation (K&A). Founded in 1939, K&A is a well- established accounting firm that provides tax, general accounting, and consulting services to thousands of small to medium sized companies in California and the Midwest. It operates out of five locations in Los Angeles, Woodland Hills, San Diego, Kansas City and Chennai (India). Following its acquisition of K&A, Prople now employs 373 people serving over 5,500 clients from operations located in six cities worldwide. In 2015, Prople closed K&A’s San Diego office and client attrition in the Midwest. Prior to the acquisition of K&A, Prople’s services included business process outsourcing, knowledge process outsourcing, and content services. K&A tripled the company’s revenue.

 

With the acquisition of K&A, Prople is primarily a tax, accounting, and consulting provider. Professional services, like tax and accounting, have some switching costs as the provider is embedded in the company’s operations becoming an integral part of the team. Despite the switching costs, the industry is fragmented and bargaining power of the provider can be decreased by using multiple suppliers.

 

 

AGP International Holdings Ltd.

 

AGP International (AG&P) is Southeast Asia’s leading modular fabricator of refinery and petrochemical plants, power plants, liquid natural gas facilities, mining processing, offshore platforms, and other infrastructure. AG&P has 110 years of experience serving clients like British Petroleum, Shell and Total.

 

Anscor made its first investment in AG&P in December 2011. In June 2013, Anscor subscribed to 83.9 million series C, voting preferred shares in AG&P. Series B and Series C preferred shares are convertible at the option of the holder, into class A common shares. The subscription increased Anscor’s holdings to 27%.

 

Similar to cable manufacturing there are no barriers to entry within the modular fabrication.

 

Anscor’s businesses do not appear to be competitively advantaged. The lack of barriers to entry makes industry analysis irrelevant.

 

Listed above is the company’s shareholder structure. 50.7% of the shares issued are held by a 100% owned subsidiary. Insiders own another 27.1% of shares issued, affiliates own 3.2% of shares issued, and the public own 19.0% of shares issued.

 

 

VALUATION

 

The lack of barriers to entry within Anscor’s businesses and the management team is deeply entrenched the company’s earnings power is the best method of measuring the company’s value as the earnings generated are likely to continue. Assuming average management and a lack of barriers to entry means the value of the company’s assets should be close to the company’s earnings valuation as excess returns are unlikely and cyclical adjusted earnings should be close to the company’s discount rate.

 

Given the company’s large investments in securities and associates, we use net income as the best measure of the company’s earnings and equity as the best measure of investment capital. Since 2010, Anscor has generated an average net income of PHP1,423 on an average tangible equity of PHP12,106 equating to a roughly 11.8% return on equity.

 

Given the lack of barriers to entry in Anscor’s businesses, growth does not create value and therefore is irrelevant; therefore, assuming a 10% discount rate Anscor should be trading at roughly 1.18 times tangible book value representing a 110% upside.

 

Anscor is trading on a cyclically adjusted PE of 5.46 times meaning in the absence of growth, the company’s expected annualized return in 18.3%.

 

Given the company’s ability to generate a consistent return on equity equal to the company’s discount rate, the reproduction value of the company’s assets should equal the company’s tangible book value. It is difficult to say a collection of assets are impaired if they generate a return equal to the discount rate.

 

Anscor’s fair value is between tangible book (77% upside) and 1.18 times tangible book (110% upside).

 

 

RISKS

 

A company with a dominant shareholder (A. Soriano III) brings potential corporate governance issues. Anscor only material related party transactions are key management remuneration, which averaged 8.8% of net income over the past five years. Key management remuneration is a little high but the absence of any other related party transactions and the cheap valuations means it can be overlooked.

 

Our goal with assessing macro risk is not to forecast the path of macroeconomic indicators but to eliminate risks from a poor macroeconomic position. Anscor’s business is primarily in the Philippines, a country that seems to be in very good financial health. In 2015, the country’s current account was 2.6% of GDP and its structural balance was 0.18% of GDP allowing the country to self-finance all the domestic initiatives as well as decrease the country’s debt load. The country does not have too much credit in the system with domestic credit provided by the financial sector at 59.1% at the end of 2015, which is well below the Emerging Markets average of 97.5% and the High Income countries average of 205%. Gross government debt as a percentage of GDP stood just under 35% with External Debt to GDP at 36%. The one concerning macroeconomic indicator is the level of growth in credit in the Philippines. Over the past five years, the amount of domestic credit provided by the financial sector has increased at a rate 12% per annum. When a country is growing its banking assets at this pace, there is a high probability of an increase in non-performing loans. The country’s banking system has a healthy capital balance with capital to assets at 10.6%.

 

The investment is based on Anscor’s strong financially health. If the company were to leverage its balance sheet, the attractiveness of the investment opportunity would decline.

 

The investment is also based on Anscor’s consistently generating net income around its cost of capital. If earnings in the business were to permanently decline, the investment would become much less attractive.

 

If earnings were to decline making a liquidation value a more appropriate valuation methodology, there is still 30% upside meaning there is significant downside protection.

 

If Anscor were to make expensive acquisitions, it would decrease the returns in the business through the write down of income and equity.

 

Given the nature of Anscor’s businesses, they all lack barriers to entry and therefore are at risk of increased supply depressing profitability.

 

Most of Anscor’s businesses are cyclical in nature and subject to macroeconomic risks.

 

At the end of Q3 2016, 47% of Anscor’s assets were in available for sale securities or fair value through the profit and loss investments making the company exposed to the fluctuations of the Philippines Stock Exchange.

WEEKLY COMMENTARY 2/6/17-2/12/17

WEEKLY COMMENTARY               2/6/17-2/12/17

 

 

CURRENT POSITIONS

 

 

 

COMPANY NEWS

 

After the company’s recent share price appreciation, Grendene’s estimated five-year annualized return has fallen to roughly 10% base on scenario analysis.

 

There are barriers to entry within Grendene’s Brazilian business. Within Brazil, it is a low cost operator with scale advantage due to heavy investments in advertising, product development, automation, and process improvements. It produces a low priced experienced good with a strong brand allowing for pricing power. Grendene’s exports are at the low end of the cost curve ensuring the company stays competitive in export markets but growth in exports markets will come with lower profitability due to the weakened competitive position and excess returns.

 

Owner operators with strong operational skills, an understanding of its competitive position, and who treat all stakeholders with respect run the company. It also has consistently generated stable, excess profit even during periods of industry stress and has a net cash balance sheet.

 

Given the company’s expected return, the company’s competitive position, and the strength of management, we are decreasing our position size to 2.0%. Please review our initiation (link) for a more in-depth discussion on the company.

 

 

INTERESTING LINKS

 

 

My Interview with Jason Zweig (Safal Niveshak)

 

Vishal Khandelwal interviews Jason Zweig, who provides some very good ideas on improving your investment process. (link)

 

 

The Making of a Brand (Collaboration Fund)

 

In a wonderful article, Morgan Housel of the Collaboration Fund discusses the history of brands and what a brand is. (link)

 

 

Riding a retail roll out (Phil Oakley)

 

Phil Oakley discusses the difficulty in investing in retail rollouts. (link)

 

 

January 2017 Data Update 7: Profitability, Excess Returns and Governance (Musing on Markets)

 

Professor Damodaran provides some interesting statistics on ROIC across geographies and sectors. (link)

 

 

Investing Mastery Through Deliberate Practice (MicroCap Club)

 

Chip Maloney talks about the benefits of deliberate practice and how to use deliberate practice to make you a better investor. (link)

 

 

Out with the old (Investor Chronicle)

 

Todd Wenning provides insight on when to sell your investments (link)

 

 

2 Bitter Truths of Stock Valuation…and How You Can Avoid Them (Safal Niveshak)

 

Vishal Khandelwal highlights potential mistakes in valuing companies and how to avoid them. (link)

 

 

Revlon’s restructuring plan represents the future of legacy beauty (Glossy)

 

Glossy magazine writes about the beauty business. (link)

 

 

6 smart tips for micro-cap investors (Morningstar)

 

Ian Cassel gives readers 6 tips for micro-cap investors. These are useful for all investors. (link)

 

 

HAW PAR CORPORATION (HPAR:SP)

 

 

Company Description

 

Haw Par Corporation is a corporation with two operating businesses and strategic investments. The company’s two operating businesses are healthcare and leisure. The company’s healthcare business is the owner of the Tiger Balm, a well-known topical analgesic. The company’s leisure business own and operate two aquariums: Underwater World Singapore in Sentosa and Underwater World Pattaya in Thailand. The company also has investments in property and quoted securities.

 

 

Healthcare

 

Haw Par’s healthcare business manufactures and markets Tiger Balm and Kwan Loong. Tiger Balm is a renowned ointment used worldwide to invigorate the body as well as to relieve aches and pains. Its product extensions such as Tiger Balm Medicated Plaster, Tiger Balm Joint Rub, Tiger Balm Neck and Shoulder Rub, Tiger Balm Mosquito Repellent Patch and Tiger Balm ACTIVE range cater to the lifestyle needs of a new health-conscious generation..At first glance, the company’s healthcare business looks like a very attractive business. Tiger Balm is a trusted brand that has been around for over 100 years and generates very strong profitability.

 

Over the past four years, the healthcare business has increased sales by 18.4% per year while increasing its operating margin by 4.4 percentage points per annum and asset turnover by 0.14 per annum leading to an increase in its ROA from 27.7% in 2012 to 60.9% in 2015.

 

The majority of Haw Par’s health care business revenues are in Asia, but the company is growing fastest in America.

 

The company’s strategy for the healthcare business is to drive growth from further product penetration across existing markets to widen the brand franchise for Tiger Balm. The company has launched new products in several markets. Sales of Tiger Balm’s range of traditional and new products continued to grow in most of its key markets. The healthcare business’ margins improvement is due to lower commodity prices mitigating the pressures from rising staff costs amid tight labor markets.

 

 

Leisure

 

Haw Par’s leisure business owns two aquariums, Underwater World Singapore and Underwater World Pattaya.

 

In 2012, the company’s two aquariums attracted 1.48 million visitors at an average price of SGD20.50 leading to a SGD30.3 million in sales. The company generated operating profit of SGD11.80 million and a ROA of 45.8%. In 2015, the company attracted 0.76 million visitors to its two aquariums at an average price of SGD16.85 leading to SGD12.74 million in sales. The company had operating profit of SGD0.15 million, a segment profit of SGD-4.34 million and a ROA of 1.3%.  From 2012 to 2015, the number of visitors to the company’s two aquariums declined by 20% per year and the average price per visitor declined by 6.3% per year causing a sales to drop by 25.1% per year. The high level of fixed costs in the business saw operating profit fall by 76.8% per year.

 

The decline in the leisure business was caused by a decline in tourism and stiff competition from existing and new attractions, including direct competitors within the immediate vicinity of the two aquariums.

 

The leisure business is a great business as long as you are attracting a sufficient number of visitors to your property as the business is primarily fixed costs. Unfortunately, competition can easily enter the market in your vicinity decreasing the number of visitors at your property causing a decline in sales as you drop prices to attract people and an even greater decline in operating profit due to the operating leverage in the business.

 

 

Property

 

Haw Par’s owns three properties in Singapore and one in Kuala Lumpur. Of the company’s four properties, three are office buildings and one is an industrial building.

 

At the end of 2015, the company has total letable area of 45,399 square meters with an occupancy rate of 64.6%.

 

In 2015, the property division generated sales of SGD14.33 million, operating profit of SGD8.56 and ROA of 4.0%.  The division’s occupancy rate has fallen by almost 30 percentage points from 2013 to 2015, this could be due to a weaker environment or a deterioration of the properties’ competitive position as newer properties become available. I am not a big fan of property investments, as they tend to have poor return on assets and require significant leverage to generate a return near our required rate of return of 15%. On top of the poor profitability in the business, Haw Par’s occupancy rates have been falling potentially pointing to a weaker competitive position of the company’s properties.

 

 

Investments

 

Since 2012, Haw Par’s investment business accounted for 76.7% of the assets on the company’s balance sheet. At the end of 2015, United Overseas Bank (UOB:SP) accounted for 66.4% of the company’s available for sale securities, UOL Group (UOL:SP) accounted for 13.0%, and United Industrial Corp (UIC:SP) accounted for 9.5%.  United Overseas Bank, UOL Group, and United Industrial are all related parties as Wee Cho Yaw is the Chairman of Haw Par and the three other corporations.

 

Profit before tax is dividend income. Since 2012, the investment business has generated an average dividend income of 3.2%.

 

Since 1987, United Overseas Bank’s average annualized return was 7.0%, UOL Group’s was 5.2%, and United Industrial’s was 1.2%, nowhere near an acceptable return.

 

 

Management

 

Members of management are owner operators with insiders owning roughly 60% of Haw Par.  Management is doing a great job operating Tiger Balm but the rest of the business is a capital allocation nightmare with poor investments in leisure and property along with significant cross holdings in other family businesses.

 

Management also extracts far too much value with the average remuneration to key management personnel over the past two years at 9.9% of operating income. Operating income is used rather than profit before tax as the investment income and property income are poor capital allocation decision and it would be best if that money were returned to shareholders.  Since the income generated below operating profit detracts value it is best if operating profit is used. There are related party transactions outside of key management compensation. The company has no related party transactions.

 

 

Valuation

 

The poor capital allocation and management value extraction makes the business nothing more than a deep value holding, which would require at least 50% upside using conservative assumptions to be investible. To value the company, we value the healthcare business based off a multiple of operating profit and value all other division based on liquidation value due to the poor trends see in those businesses.

 

Given the quality and growth in Haw Par’s healthcare business, we believe 15 times operating profit is a fair multiple for the business. The company’s leisure business is given no value as the number of visitors continues to decline due to newer attractions and the company’s operating leverage means the company was barely breaking even in 2015. Cash and net working capital is valued at 100% of balance sheet value. The company’s property is seeing declining occupancy rates. We conservatively assume this to be a sign of the property’s deteriorating competitive position. There are also fees associated with any liquidation therefore we value the property assets at 75% of current value. The company’s available for sale securities are assumed to be liquidated at 75% of current value, as the holdings are so large that they would have a market impact if Haw Par ever tried to sell its shares.

 

Overall, Haw Par would be interesting below SGD7.50 but only as a deep value holding given the poor capital allocation and high management salaries.

WEEKLY COMMENTARY 1/30/17-2/5/17

WEEKLY COMMENTARY               1/30/17-2/5/17

 

 

CURRENT POSITIONS

 

 

 

COMPANY NEWS

 

There was no company news over the past two weeks.

 

 

INTERESTING LINKS

 

 

Expectations Investing: Reading Stock Prices for Better Returns (Michael Mauboussin)

 

A 2006 report by Michael Mauboussin when he was at Legg Mason discussing what he calls Expectations Investing. The report also discusses the link between ROIC and PE. (link) Mr. Mauboussin discusses how investors often only look at a company’s fundamental when investors should be assessing company fundamentals then comparing them to market expectations. He argues that any returns will be driven by a change in the markets expectations. Given there are many types of value investing (quality, deep value), value investing itself is the act of ensuring the market’s expectations are well below the probable path of a company’s fundamentals.

 

In the article, Mr. Mauboussin discusses the theoretical link between ROIC and PE. We studied the relationship between ROIC and EV/EBIT and EV/IC. Growth is eliminated from our study, as it is the most difficult value driver to forecast. We feel EV/EBIT is a more appropriate measure of earnings than PE as it eliminates all non-operating items and it takes into account the whole capital structure something that ROIC takes into account. We studied a number of different Emerging Market companies in a number of different industries from 2011 to 2015. We used a company’s estimated ROIC for the year (operating profit/ (net working capital + PP&E)) and the company’s valuation at the end of the year. As illustrated below, our study found no correlation between ROIC and EV/EBIT, with the adjusted R squared at 0.01, and a strong correlation between ROIC and EV/IC, with an adjusted R squared of 0.65

 

The scatter plots graphs below visualize the correlation between ROIC and the two EV valuation multiples.

 

As you may have noticed, EV/IC is not really mentioned in our reports as we use more in-depth valuation methods. We use EV/IC vs. ROIC as a shortcut when screening companies to determine whether there may be sufficient margin of safety to spend addition time analyzing the company. Using a 10% discount rate and no growth, you can easily determine the appropriate EV/IC given a company’s ROIC by multiplying the company’s ROIC by 10.

 

 

Thirty Years Reflections on the Ten Attributes of Great Investors (Michael Mauboussin)

 

A more recent report by Michael Mauboussin discussing the ten attributes of great investors. (link)

 

 

Ten Attributes of Great Fundamental Investors

 

The top ten attributes discussed in the paper are:

 

  1. Be numerate (and understand accounting)
  2. Understand value (the present value of free cash flow)
  3. Properly assess strategy (or how a business makes money)
  4. Compare effectively (expectations versus fundamentals)
  5. Think probabilistically (there are few sure things)
  6. Update your views effectively (beliefs are hypotheses to be tested, not treasures to be protected)
  7. Beware of behavioral biases (minimizing constraints to good thinking)
  8. Know the difference between information and influence
  9. Position sizing (maximizing the payoff from edge)
  10. Read (and keep an open mind)

 

 

7 Deadly Sins of Investing…..!!! (Tortoise Wisdom)

 

Given the previous link discussed the 10 attributes of great fundamental investors, it seems appropriate to include a link discussing what not to do in investing. Tortoise Wisdom discusses the seven deadly sins of investing. (link)

 

The seven deadly sins of investing are:

 

  1. Following the herd
  2. Overconfidence
  3. Trading too much
  4. Envy
  5. Keeping Unrealistic Expectations
  6. Uncontrolled Emotions
  7. Focusing on outcome, Not on Process

 

 

The truth about pricing power (and chocolate) (Intelligent Investor)
Graham Witcomb of the Intelligent Investor provides insight into pricing power. (link)

 

 

Video Library (Hedge Fund Conversations)

 

Hedge Fund Conversations created a library of videos of hedge fund investors. It may be a useful resource. (link)

 

 

Video Library (Ben Graham Centre for Value Investing)

 

While on the topic of video libraries, The Ben Graham Centre for Value Investing at Ivey Business School has a tremendous video library of presentation given to its students by practitioners. (link)

 

 

Understanding the Role of Emerging Markets in Your Portfolio (Fortune Financial)

 

Fortune Financial discusses Emerging Markets and their role in a complete portfolio. (link)

 

 

 A Profitable Industry You’ve Likely Never Considered (Fortune Financial)

 

Fortune Financial write an article discussing Mexican airports as a potential investment. (link)

 

 

How YouTube could capitalize on its rivals’ mistakes, and conquer the future of TV (Business Insider)

 

Business Insider discusses Youtube’s potential to take ad spend from television. (link)

 

 

Rolex is suddenly battling one of the biggest threats in history (Business Insider)

 

Business Insider examines the threats to Rolex and the watch industry. (link)

 

 

Conversation with Irish Hotel Mogul Pat McCann (Independent)

 

The Independent talks with Pat McCann on the hotel industry. (link)

 

 

Curing the Addiction to Growth (Harvard Business Review)

 

Harvard Business Review discusses retailers and strategies for when growth. Interestingly, they find the key metric in determining the winners and losers is ROIC as management teams that follow ROIC do not try to grow just to grow. Their focus is only growing when it creates value. The researchers focus on two other key metrics revenue per store and estimated revenue added per new store. (link)

2016 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REVIEW AND NOT QUITE A WEEKLY COMMENTARY 12/19/16-1/8/17

2016 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REVIEW AND NOT QUITE A WEEKLY COMMENTARY 12/19/16-1/8/17

 

 

2016 ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REVIEW

 

While the annual performance review is somewhat arbitrary, it is good to review you investment process on a regular basis to find improvements.

 

In 2016, the average local currency return of our recommendations was -3.1% with the average US dollar return not far off at -3.0%. Relative performance was -5.3% as the Emerging Market Small Cap Index as measured by iShares MSCI Emerging Market Small Cap ETF (EEMS) was up 2.3% compared to our average US dollar return of -3.0%.

 

The major drag on the performance of recommendations was Miko International and Universal Health. Universal Health saw a significant decline after its founder and majority took a loan against the company’s shares leading to forced selling in the stock. Subsequently, the company’s operational performance deteriorated drastically leading us to question the validity of the company’s initial financial statements. Miko International saw a number of independent directors resign followed by its auditor resigning due to disagreements over accounts in the company’s financial statements. It hired an auditor of last resort known to work with many Chinese frauds. We also saw poor performance at another Chinese company Honworld as management’s poor capital allocation inhibits its ability to grow without raising external funds. The poor performance of the Chinese small and mid caps leads us to question the financial statements in many Chinese small and mid cap companies. Given the inability to have any conviction, we are taking a smaller position if we invest in Chinese companies. Our other Chinese investments in Peak Sports Products and Anta Sports Products were our second and third best performing stocks in 2017 making us not totally write off investing in Chinese companies. Interestingly, the poorly performing Chinese companies all recently went public and therefore we have implemented a rule of not purchasing any stock that went public in the last three years.

 

The poor performance of Universal Health and Miko International highlighted the limits to our knowledge leading us to be less aggressive with our position sizing. Our new position sizing philosophy is 1-2% for high quality watch list stocks like Credit Analysis and Research and Anta Sports, 2.0% for deep value, 2.0% for Chinese companies, and from 2.0% to 8.0% for high quality companies depending on the strength of the business and attractiveness of returns. The goal is to get 25-35 holdings. The smaller position sizes do not match with the depth of our research. Our research was deep dive taking up to a month. The depth of research clearly required the ability to take larger position sizes as you can research only 12 ideas in a year. Assuming, half that are fully researched reach our investment standard leads to a maximum of six recommendations per year. There is no way we could ever be fully invested with our new position size philosophy, therefore, we are decreasing the depth of the research so we can hopefully one day get close to fully invested. We will focus on the crucial elements of every investment but not as much in depth. Hopefully, this will also increase the value of the blog for readers as we are trying generating more ideas by researching more companies. As mentioned, we will also be looking at high quality stocks that may be slightly more expensive than our typical investment but meets all other requirements. These will be formally placed on the watch list and placed in the portfolio at a smaller position size. Credit Analysis and Research and Anta Sports fall into this category. The hope is these positions will eventual become more attractive on valuations. The side benefit is highlighting more high quality companies.

 

Since May 2014, we have made 10 recommendations generating an average outperformance of 30.9%, with three recommendations having negative absolute performance. The average time from recommendation to sale is 459 days with four of the 10 recommendations still being held.

 

Overall, 2016 was not the best year for stock selection with underperformance of 5.3%. More importantly, we feel the mistakes made have allowed us to strength our process. Despite the bad year, our recommendations are up 30.9% since May 2014.

 

The table above illustrates position sizes at the end of each half since the end of the first half of 2014.

 

In 2016, our portfolio fell be 12.8% on the back of poor performance and large positions in Universal Health, Miko International, and Honworld. Despite the poor performance in 2016, our portfolio is up 12.3% in absolute terms since inception and 24.4% relative to EEMS, while averaging 67.9% of the portfolio in cash. The large cash position is a function of our high threshold for investment and the time required in our in depth research process. Hopefully, our shorter reports will allow us to be more efficient at finding ideas allowing us to put the cash to work.

 

While 2016 was not the best year in terms of performance, the improvements made to our process due to the mistakes made should more than make up for it in the future.

 

 

CURRENT POSITIONS

 

 

 

COMPANY NEWS

 

Mrs. Kusum Jain, a non-Executive Director, resigned from PC Jeweller’s board, with effect December 30, 2016. This is the first director resignation at PC Jeweller for some time, but it is worth monitoring in case there are additional resignations from independent directors.

 

On December 21, 2016, Zensar Technologies announced it appointed Manoj Jaiswal as Chief Financial Officer. Manoj Jaiswal was Chief Financial Officer for CEAT, another RPG Enterprises company. Before joining CEAT, Manoj had spent 17 years in Wipro in different roles.

 

Zensar also changed its auditor to Deloitte from PricewaterhouseCooper. Under Section 139(2) of the Companies Act, 2013, all listed companies and certain categories of unlisted public companies and private companies are mandated to rotate their auditors after 10 or more consecutive years.

 

On January 7, 2017, CARE announced that it was shutting down its Maldives operations after its license expired and decided not to renew. The Maldives operations were insignificant.

 

 

INTERESTING LINKS

 

 

Horsehead Holdings (Aquamarine Fund)

 

Guy Spier, a noted value investor, and portfolio manager of Aquamarine Fund looks back at his investment in Horsehead Holdings. It is a very good template for looking back and learning from your investment mistakes. (link)

 

Looking For the Easy Game (Credit Suisse)

 

Credit Suisse’s Michael Mauboussin discusses passive and active investing. (link)

 

A Bird in Hand is Worth More Than (Forecasted) Eggs in the Future (Latticework)

 

This is a very good article by Amit Wadhwaney of Moerus Capital Management discussing his investment philosophy. (link)

 

The Future of Retail 2016 (Business Insider)

 

Business Insider’s BI Intelligence unit created an interesting slide deck on the future of retail. The slide on the article illustrates the share of digital in different categories. Useful for understanding what segments of retail are most impacted by the internet. (link)

 

Patagonia’s Philosopher King (New Yorker)

 

The New Yorker wrote an article on Yvon Chouinard, the co-founder of the outdoor-apparel company Patagonia. (link)

 

The Irrationality Within Us (Scientific American)

 

Scientific American discusses our irrationality. (link)

 

Charlie Munger on the Paradox in Hold vs. Buy Decisions in Long Term Investing (Fundoo Professor)

 

Professor Sanjay Bakshi discusses Charlie Munger’s thoughts on the decision to continue to hold a stock vs. the decision to buy a stock. (link) The comment section should be read as well as there are many insightful comments. As illustrated by the changing of our positions sizes, we do not subscribe to the buy and hold regardless of valuation. By saying that you would continue to hold an asset at a particular price but you would not buy the same amount if you did not hold it, you are ascribing more value to the asset you hold, which is a bit irrational and is known as the endowment effect. Endowment effect is valuing an item you own more than an identical item you do not own. We try to look at all companies the same way, whether we hold them or not. First, a high percentage of companies can be ruled out as a potential investment due to poor financial health, poor management, or poor business quality. We may compromise on business quality if the company is a deep value investment but there is a limit on this compromise. Once companies pass the first investment hurdle, we assess the attractiveness of the company based on its business quality, management, growth outlook, and risk. Future returns are estimated based on scenarios giving a range of potential returns. If the market values a company so highly that very aggressive assumptions are required to meet the market’s expectations, we would not buy a company or hold a position. If on the other hand, if the market was valuing that same company so cheaply that the most conservative assumptions pointed to significant upside and there was sufficient business quality, we would take our maximum position of 8%. In between the two extremes is a spectrum of potential returns leading to a spectrum of position sizes between 0% and 8%. The decision of the position size is based on the attractiveness of the returns of a business not whether we hold a stock or not.

 

Valuation and Investment Analysis (Bronte Capital)

 

Bronte Capital wrote an article discussing how they do not use valuations in their investment process. (link) Again, please read the comments as there are some useful comments.  Clearly, we do not agree with Bronte Capital’s view.  We agree that valuation is difficult and does not provide a point estimate that is why ranges and scenario analysis needs to be used in the valuation process or reverse engineering a DCF or Residual Income model to find out the market’s expectations of key value driver assumptions. These market assumptions can be tested for reasonableness. We believe it is very difficult for anyone to call themselves an investor if they do not have some estimate of what is the value of potential investment. Investing requires understanding the fundamentals of the business, and the valuations of the business. Value investing requires an additional margin of safety to ensure you are not buying a business with sufficiently attractive returns. Not having an estimate of the potential returns of an investment is pure speculation. Bronte Capital focus on operational momentum to ensure the business will continue to grow for a long time. The problem is growth stocks often do not meet the growth expectations of the market and this is precisely why you should have an understanding of what type of growth the market is expecting. Within the Emerging Markets small cap universe, the MSCI Emerging Markets Small Cap Growth Index has underperformed the MSCI Emerging Markets Small Cap Value Index by 141.34% over the past 16 years or 5.66% per annum. Similar to Bronte Capital, growth investors are more concerned with growth than valuation leading to missing a big piece of the puzzle in understanding a business.

 

Value vs. Growth in Emerging Markets

 

Given the past two articles, we thought it be interesting to review the performance of various Emerging Market indices to see how each style has performed.

 

The table above illustrates the performance of MSCI Emerging Market indices across size and style biases. Indices have various inception dates so the longest time period with performance for all indices is 10 years. Over that period, the best performing index is Emerging Markets Quality index followed by Small Cap Value and the Small Cap Index. Over the past 20 years within the large and mid cap universe, value outperformed growth by 1.00% per annum. Quality seems to be the best performing index outperforming the overall index by 1.95% per annum since 06/30/1994 compared to only 0.44% per annum outperformance of value over the past 20 years, and -0.57% underperformance by growth over 20 years. There is a one and a half year difference in the long term performance figures if quality and value and growth, but given the length of the track record there would need to be a drastic underperformance of quality (roughly 35%) over that one and half years for quality’s performance to fall back to the value index’s level of performance. With some confidence, we can say quality has been the best style among the Emerging Markets large and mid cap universe.

 

Small Cap outperformed the large and mid cap index by 1.24% per annum illustrating a persistence of the size premium in Emerging Markets. Within the Emerging Markets small cap universe, value outperformed growth by 5.66% per annum over the past 16 years. The 5.66% growth translates into 141.34% additional performance over the period. There is no small cap quality index to compare the quality style.

 

Value outperforms growth in Emerging Markets with significant outperformance vs. the benchmark and growth in the Emerging Market small cap universe. Brandes Institute of Brandes Investment Partners did a study on style bias in Emerging Markets, which can be found here.

 

Alexa: Amazon’s Operating System (Stratechery)

 

Ben Thompson always writes great articles on technology therefore is a must read. We tend not to invest in technology as short product life cycles leading to disruption leading to difficulty valuing these companies. Despite the difficulties in technology, Silicon Valley and start-ups are very good at understanding all aspects of business models and therefore reading some of the best writers in the industry helps increase understanding of business models in more investable industries. In this particular article, Mr. Thompson writes the business model of operating systems. (link)

 

Tren’s Advice for Twitter (25iq)

 

Like Stratechery, 25iq is a must read. Tren Griffin works in the technology industry but is a value investor. Mr. Griffin gives his advice to Twitter. His advice is relevant for all companies. Understand your competitive advantage and continue to strengthen it while being as operationally efficient as possible. There is not much more to strategy. Understand your competitive advantage.  If it is unique advantage,  strengthen it as much as possible. If it is a shared competitive advantage, try to cooperate with competitors as much as possible to distribute fairly the benefits of the value created by the shared competitive advantage. If there are no competitive advantages, operational efficiency is the most important thing. Due to institutional imperative, which prevents firms from acting as rational as they can, operational efficiency can allow one firm to persist with excess profits for a long time. The importance to barriers to entry on strategy and profitability illustrates why the identification of competitive advantages, also known as barriers to entry, are so crucial to Reperio’s investment process. (link)

 

Amazon’s 2004 Shareholder Letter

 

Amazon’s 2004 Shareholder Letter stresses the importance of free cash flow not earnings the main metric followed by most market participants as earnings does not take into working capital and fixed capital investments required to generate additional earnings, while free cash flow accounts for the necessary investments. (link)

WEEKLY COMMENTARY November 21, 2016 – November 27, 2016

WEEKLY COMMENTARY November 21, 2016 – November 27, 2016

 position-summary-table

 

 

COMPANY NEWS

 

PC Jeweller

 

PC Jeweller reported FQ2 2017 results on November 23, 2016. During the quarter, the company opened five stores including a franchised showroom bringing the total number of showrooms to 68. The company also introduced the Inayat wedding jewelry collection and the Azva festive and wedding season collection, which is selling in 15 independent retailers.

 

Year on year, the company’s revenues grew by 30.2%, gross profit declined by 0.9%, and operating profit declined by 5.3%. Gross margin declined from 16.3% in FQ2 2016 to 12.4% in FQ2 2017. To review the company’s business, the mix between exports and domestic sales and the mix between diamond and gold jewelry sold drive gross margin.

pc-jeweller-business-model

The expected sales mix between domestic sales and export sales is roughly 67 % to 33% with domestic sales having an estimated gross margin of 16-17% while export sales have a gross margin of 6-8%. Gold jewelry sales is expected to represent 70-75% of domestic sales with a gross margin of roughly 10%, while diamond jewelry sales is expected to represent 25-30% of domestic sales with a gross margin of roughly 25-30%.

pc-jeweller-sales-mix-and-gross-margin

The table above illustrates the actual figures on a quarterly basis dating back to the quarter ending December 2012. Since FQ3 2013, domestic sales averaged 72.3% of sales while gold sales averaged 70.5% of domestic sales. Domestic sales averaged a gross margin of 16.4%, export sales averaged a gross margin of 10.6%, and the overall gross margin averaged 14.4%. Using expected figures, gross margins should range from 12.7% to 14.0%. Operating expense averaged 3.8% of sales leading to an expected operating margin range of 8.9% to 10.2%.

 

Regarding demonetization, 32% of sales are cash sales so the company expects short-term impact from demonetization.

 

Overall, the company is operating in an industry without barriers to entry as illustrated by the thousands of competitors, but management has been able to consistent excess profits when peers other than Titan have struggled to generate any excess profits. Given the ability generate excess profits during industry distress and when peers cannot gives us confidence that valuing the company on earnings is appropriate.

 

Under our pessimist case scenario, which assumes a 12.5% discount rate, no growth into perpetuity and profitability fading to the discount rate in year 10, PC Jeweller has 4.3% annualized downside over the next five years. Under our base case scenario, PC Jeweller grows at 10% for a five-year forecast period (store openings) before fading to 0% in the terminal value in year 10. Current excess profits remain over the forecast period before halving in the terminal. Excess profits persist in our base case because of the strength of management and evidence that the company can generate excess profits when competitors cannot. Under the base case, PC Jeweller’s estimated annualized return is 9.1% over the next five years. Under the optimistic case, there is no change to profitability with growth increasing to 15.0% over the forecast period and 2.5% growth in the terminal value leading to an annualized return of 16.0% over the next five years.

 

The table below illustrates our assumptions under each scenario as well as historical averages for each key value driver.

pc-jeweller-scenario-assumptions

 

The company’s management is very strong and continues to generate excess returns in a fragmented industry where competitors struggle to generate excess profits. We will maintain our 4.0% position size.

 

 

PRE-RESEARCH REPORT

 

Executive Summary

 

ABS-CBN is a Filipino media conglomerate with three business segments: TV and Studios, Pay TV Networks, and New Business. The TV and Studios business generates 73.6% of revenue and 92.1% of EBITDA. Economies of scale exist in the form of content creation and distribution creating an advantage for the largest competitors. ABS-CBN is the largest. Unfortunately, the company is operationally inefficient generating an average of roughly 10% return on net operating assets over the past three years. The company’s Pay TV Network business only generates an average return on net operating asset of 2.3% over the past three years despite having a 45% cable market share in the Philippines. New businesses are a disparate group of organizations with no strategic connection pointing to extremely poor capital allocation. The average NOPAT margin of new businesses over the past three years is -253.4%.

 

Given the inability of the company to generate a reasonable return on a competitively advantaged business and the weak capital allocation, the company is unlikely to be considered for investment unless it trade well below book value (<0.5) or at a very cheap earnings multiple (<7 preferably <5). A change in ownership or evidence of the company improving its operational efficiency and/or capital allocation would potentially warrant a change to the view. The company currently trades at over 2 times invested capital and 16.5 times NOPAT well above its fair value based on the returns generated by the business. To reach an acceptable buy price, the company’s share price would need to fall to PHP15.00 per share.

 

 

Company Description

 

ABS-CBN Corporation is the Philippines’ leading media and entertainment organization. Primarily involved in television and radio, the company has expanded owning the leading cinema and music production/distribution companies in the country as well as operating the largest cable TV service provider.

 

ABS-CBN has business interests in merchandising, licensing, mobile and online multimedia services, publishing, video and audio postproduction, overseas telecommunication services, money remittance, cargo forwarding, TV shopping services, food and restaurant services, theme park development and management, and property management.

 

 

History

 

ABS-CBN Corporation traces its roots from Bolinao Electronics Corporation (BEC), an assembler of radio transmitting equipment, established in 1946. In 1952, BEC adopted the business name Alto Broadcasting System (ABS) and began setting up the country’s first television broadcast by 1953. On September 24, 1956, Chronicle Broadcasting Network (CBN), owned by Don Eugenio Lopez Sr. of the Lopez family, was organized primarily for radio broadcasting. In 1957, Don Eugenio Lopez Sr. acquired ABS and on February 1, 1967, the operations of ABS and CBN were integrated and BEC changed its corporate name to ABS-CBN Broadcasting Corporation. On August 16, 2010, the Philippine Securities and Exchange Commission approved the change of the corporate name to ABS-CBN Corporation reflecting the company’s diversified businesses in existing and new industries. ABS-CBN achieved many firsts since it started the television industry in the country in 1953. However, with the imposition of martial law in September 1972, ABS-CBN ceased operations as the government forcibly took control. ABS-CBN resumed commercial operations in 1986 after the People Power or EDSA revolution. Despite being shut for 14 years, ABS-CBN recaptured leadership in the Philippine television and radio industries by 1988. During the 1990s and the early part of the new millennium, the company expanded and ventured into complementary businesses in cable TV, international distribution, mobile services, and magazine publishing among others.

 

 

Shareholder Structure

 

The top 20 shareholders own 98.57% of the business.

abs-cbn-shareholder-structure

 

Lopez Inc. is the largest shareholder at 55.15%. Lopez Inc. is a Filipino business conglomerate owned by the López family of Iloilo. Oscar M. López is the Chairman Emeritus and his brother Manuel M. López is the current Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of the López Group. It was first established by Eugenio Lopez, Sr. in 1928. It has holdings in many industries including media, power, energy, real estate, infrastructure, and manufacturing.

 

PCD Nominee Corporation is a wholly owned subsidiary of Philippine Central Depository. Shares are held at PCD Nominee Corporation for other shareholders.

 

 

Current Business

In 2015, ABS-CBN’s generated PHP38,278 million with 73.6% of revenue from the TV and Studio business, 21.1% from Pay TV Networks and 5.2% from new businesses.

abs-cbn-revenue-by-segment

 

In 2015, ABS-CBN generated PHP8,083 million in EBITDA. The TV and Studio business generated 92.1% of EBITDA, Pay TV Networks generated 20.7%, and new businesses generated -12.8%.

abs-cbn-ebitda-by-segment

 

As illustrated above, ABS-CBN has three business segments: TV and Studio, Pay TV Networks, and new businesses.

 

TV and Studio

 

The TV and studio segment is comprised of broadcast, global operations, film and music production, cable channels and publishing. This consists of local and global content creation and distribution through television and radio broadcasting.

 

abs-cbn-tv-and-studio-revenue

 

In 2015, free to air TV accounted for 63.4% of revenue, global operations accounted for 19.2% of revenue, with films and music, narrowcast, and others accounting for the remaining 17.4% of revenue.

 

The Free to air TV business includes content creation and distribution mainly through free TV and radio with Channel 2 and DZMM as its flagship platforms. The content created is predominantly in Filipino and is aimed at the mass Filipino audience. The company’s leading position in the Philippine television broadcasting industry is largely due to the popularity of its entertainment programs, while the news and public affairs programs have developed a reputation for the quality of news coverage that includes national, local and international events.

php-ratings-and-audience-share

 

In 2015, ABS-CBN 41.5% audience share in all of Philippines. There is significant barrier to entry in the form of economies of scale with content creation being a large fixed cost required to acquire an audience. The industry is very concentrated pointing to the existence of a barrier to entry. The top two players ABS-CBN and GMA Network have roughly an 80% market share.

 

The global business pioneered the international content distribution through Direct to Home, cable, Internet Protocol Television, mobile and online through The Filipino Channel. It is available in all territories where there is a significant market of overseas Filipinos such as the Unites States, Middle East, Europe, Australia, Canada and Asia Pacific. Other activities include international film distribution, remittance, retail, sponsorships and events. Similar to free to air, there are economies of scale in the form of content creation with much of the content created for the free to air business can be used in global operations. Distribution is another fixed cost in the global segment intensifying economies of scale. Efficient scale also comes into play, as the global market for Filipino content is not that large therefore the market cannot support many players. GMA Network also produces content for the international market.

 

The films and music business is composed of movie production, film distribution, audio recording and distribution and video and audio postproduction. Films and music needs are generally produced through ABS-CBN Film Productions Inc. (AFPI), more popularly known as Star Cinema. Other movies are co-produced with other local or international producers or are simply distributed by AFPI. Music needs are also managed by AFPI to complement the recording needs of the company’s multi-talented artists and handle music publishing and composing requirements, respectively.

 

The Narrowcast and sports business caters to the needs of specific or targeted audiences or markets not normally addressed by the broadcast business. Included in this line of business are cable programming and channel offerings such as Filipino movie channel, music channel, animé, upscale male sports content and upscale female lifestyle content. It also covers print, sports, and other niched programming via its UHF (Ultra High Frequency) channel. Narrowcast includes the following subsidiaries: Creative Programs, Inc., ABS-CBN Publishing, Inc., and Studio 23, Inc. As part of the company’s goal to elevate boxing as a sport in the country, it entered into a joint venture agreement with ALA Sports Promotions, Inc., a world class boxing organization and promotional company.

 

In the whole TV and Studio segment, economies of scale as content creation or acquiring content is a significant upfront fixed cost. Being the market leader in free to air TV with a 41.5% audience share illustrate the strong competitive position of ABS-CBN.

tv-studio-key-drivers

 

Despite the existence of economies of scale and market share leadership, ABS-CBN’s is only able to generate an average return on net operating assets of 9.9% over the past three years point to operational inefficiency.

 

 

Pay TV Networks

 

ABS-CBN owns 59.4% of Sky Cable Corporation. Sky Cable provides cable television services in Metro Manila and in certain provincial areas in the Philippines. As of December 2015, Sky Cable held a 45% market share in the Philippines. Sky Cable’s main competitor in the pay TV business is Cignal. The company also competes with other small local operators in certain cities it operates in, but no other operator has the same scale and geographic reach as Sky Cable. Given the fixed cost associated with infrastructure needed for cable coverage, size is a key competitive factor. Size also helps with bargaining power.

 

The company also provides broadband internet services through Sky Broadband. PLDT dominates the broadband industry with 65% market share.

pay-tv-network-key-value-drivers 

 

Cable television requires infrastructure, which is an upfront fixed expense. Despite its size advantage, Sky Cable is unable to generate a reasonable return pointing to operational inefficiency.

 

 

New Business

 

ABS-CBN’s new businesses include wireless telecommunications business, digital terrestrial television, theme parks and home shopping.

 

ABS-CBN mobile’s network sharing agreement with Globe Telecom enables the company to deliver content in addition to traditional telecommunication services on mobile devices. Through the network-sharing agreement, Globe provides capacity and coverage on its existing cellular mobile telephony network to ABS-CBN Convergence, Inc. (ABS-C) on a nationwide basis. The parties may also share assets such as servers, towers, and switches.

 

In February 2015, ABS-CBN commercially launched the digital terrestrial television (DTT). The company continues to invest in DTT equipment to improve clarity of signal in certain areas of Mega Manila and Central Luzon with a belief that the transition from analogue to digital will result in an increase in its audience share.

 

ABS-CBN invested in a theme park more popularly known as KidZania Manila. KidZania provides children and their parents a safe, unique, and very realistic educational environment that allows kids between the ages of four to twelve to do what comes naturally to them: role-playing by mimicking traditionally adult activities. As in the real world, children perform “jobs” and are either paid for their work (as a fireman, doctor, police officer, journalist, shopkeeper, etc.) or pay to shop or to be entertained. The indoor theme park is a city built to scale for children, complete with buildings, paved streets, vehicles, a functioning economy, and recognizable destinations in the form of “establishments” sponsored and branded by leading multinational and local brands.

 

Launced in October 2013, A CJ O Shopping Corporation is a joint venture between ABS-CBN and CJ O Shopping Corporation of Korea to provide TV home shopping in the Philippines.

new-business-key-value-drivers

 

ABS-CBN’s new businesses generate significant losses and there seems to be no strategic logic when allocating capital. New businesses are from a variety of industries where the company does not have any particular competitive advantage, which leads to the losses. The poor capital allocation will affect the ability of the company to grow its intrinsic value. Capital allocation is unlikely to change with the current management and ownership.

 

 

Valuation

 

Given the inability of the company to generate a reasonable return in a competitively advantaged business and the weak capital allocation, the company is unlikely to be considered for investment unless it trade well below book value (<0.5) or at a very cheap earnings multiple (<7 preferably <5). A change in ownership or evidence of the company improving its operational efficiency and/or capital allocation would warrant a change to the view. The company currently trades at over 2 times invested capital and 16.5 times NOPAT well above its fair value based on the returns generated by the business.

 

 

INTERESTING LINKS

 

A Dozen Things Warren Buffett and Charlie Munger Learned From See’s Candies (25iq)

A discussion about the lesson from See’s Candies (link)

 

Mental Model: Price Incentives (Greenwood Investors)

An good article by Greenwood Investors discussing discounting and brands (link)

 

Two Powerful Mental Models: Network Effects and Critical Mass (A16Z)

The title speaks for itself, an excellent essay on network effects and critical mass. (link)

 

The Reason We Underperform – Markets Have Evolved Faster Than Humans (Acquirer’s Multiple)

An article discussing potential behavioral reasons for the underperformance of fund management. (link)

 

Anatomy of a Failed Investment (Tom Macpherson- Gurufocus)

A great reminder to never be too confident of one’s views as there is only so much that one can prove to be absolute truth. Understand the counter to your argument and always remember looking for evidence confirming either side. (link)

 

Frozen Accidents: Why the Future Is So Unpredictable (Farnam Street)

The must read blog Farnam Street discusses how complexity and randomness make prediction a difficult if not impossible task. (link) We agree with the difficulty associated with forecasting and attempt to make as few forecasts as possible. Instead, we wait until the key value drivers being priced into by the market are so pessimist that there is little downside.