Tag Archives: Singapore

WEEKLY COMMENTARY 2/6/17-2/12/17

WEEKLY COMMENTARY               2/6/17-2/12/17

 

 

CURRENT POSITIONS

 

 

 

COMPANY NEWS

 

After the company’s recent share price appreciation, Grendene’s estimated five-year annualized return has fallen to roughly 10% base on scenario analysis.

 

There are barriers to entry within Grendene’s Brazilian business. Within Brazil, it is a low cost operator with scale advantage due to heavy investments in advertising, product development, automation, and process improvements. It produces a low priced experienced good with a strong brand allowing for pricing power. Grendene’s exports are at the low end of the cost curve ensuring the company stays competitive in export markets but growth in exports markets will come with lower profitability due to the weakened competitive position and excess returns.

 

Owner operators with strong operational skills, an understanding of its competitive position, and who treat all stakeholders with respect run the company. It also has consistently generated stable, excess profit even during periods of industry stress and has a net cash balance sheet.

 

Given the company’s expected return, the company’s competitive position, and the strength of management, we are decreasing our position size to 2.0%. Please review our initiation (link) for a more in-depth discussion on the company.

 

 

INTERESTING LINKS

 

 

My Interview with Jason Zweig (Safal Niveshak)

 

Vishal Khandelwal interviews Jason Zweig, who provides some very good ideas on improving your investment process. (link)

 

 

The Making of a Brand (Collaboration Fund)

 

In a wonderful article, Morgan Housel of the Collaboration Fund discusses the history of brands and what a brand is. (link)

 

 

Riding a retail roll out (Phil Oakley)

 

Phil Oakley discusses the difficulty in investing in retail rollouts. (link)

 

 

January 2017 Data Update 7: Profitability, Excess Returns and Governance (Musing on Markets)

 

Professor Damodaran provides some interesting statistics on ROIC across geographies and sectors. (link)

 

 

Investing Mastery Through Deliberate Practice (MicroCap Club)

 

Chip Maloney talks about the benefits of deliberate practice and how to use deliberate practice to make you a better investor. (link)

 

 

Out with the old (Investor Chronicle)

 

Todd Wenning provides insight on when to sell your investments (link)

 

 

2 Bitter Truths of Stock Valuation…and How You Can Avoid Them (Safal Niveshak)

 

Vishal Khandelwal highlights potential mistakes in valuing companies and how to avoid them. (link)

 

 

Revlon’s restructuring plan represents the future of legacy beauty (Glossy)

 

Glossy magazine writes about the beauty business. (link)

 

 

6 smart tips for micro-cap investors (Morningstar)

 

Ian Cassel gives readers 6 tips for micro-cap investors. These are useful for all investors. (link)

 

 

HAW PAR CORPORATION (HPAR:SP)

 

 

Company Description

 

Haw Par Corporation is a corporation with two operating businesses and strategic investments. The company’s two operating businesses are healthcare and leisure. The company’s healthcare business is the owner of the Tiger Balm, a well-known topical analgesic. The company’s leisure business own and operate two aquariums: Underwater World Singapore in Sentosa and Underwater World Pattaya in Thailand. The company also has investments in property and quoted securities.

 

 

Healthcare

 

Haw Par’s healthcare business manufactures and markets Tiger Balm and Kwan Loong. Tiger Balm is a renowned ointment used worldwide to invigorate the body as well as to relieve aches and pains. Its product extensions such as Tiger Balm Medicated Plaster, Tiger Balm Joint Rub, Tiger Balm Neck and Shoulder Rub, Tiger Balm Mosquito Repellent Patch and Tiger Balm ACTIVE range cater to the lifestyle needs of a new health-conscious generation..At first glance, the company’s healthcare business looks like a very attractive business. Tiger Balm is a trusted brand that has been around for over 100 years and generates very strong profitability.

 

Over the past four years, the healthcare business has increased sales by 18.4% per year while increasing its operating margin by 4.4 percentage points per annum and asset turnover by 0.14 per annum leading to an increase in its ROA from 27.7% in 2012 to 60.9% in 2015.

 

The majority of Haw Par’s health care business revenues are in Asia, but the company is growing fastest in America.

 

The company’s strategy for the healthcare business is to drive growth from further product penetration across existing markets to widen the brand franchise for Tiger Balm. The company has launched new products in several markets. Sales of Tiger Balm’s range of traditional and new products continued to grow in most of its key markets. The healthcare business’ margins improvement is due to lower commodity prices mitigating the pressures from rising staff costs amid tight labor markets.

 

 

Leisure

 

Haw Par’s leisure business owns two aquariums, Underwater World Singapore and Underwater World Pattaya.

 

In 2012, the company’s two aquariums attracted 1.48 million visitors at an average price of SGD20.50 leading to a SGD30.3 million in sales. The company generated operating profit of SGD11.80 million and a ROA of 45.8%. In 2015, the company attracted 0.76 million visitors to its two aquariums at an average price of SGD16.85 leading to SGD12.74 million in sales. The company had operating profit of SGD0.15 million, a segment profit of SGD-4.34 million and a ROA of 1.3%.  From 2012 to 2015, the number of visitors to the company’s two aquariums declined by 20% per year and the average price per visitor declined by 6.3% per year causing a sales to drop by 25.1% per year. The high level of fixed costs in the business saw operating profit fall by 76.8% per year.

 

The decline in the leisure business was caused by a decline in tourism and stiff competition from existing and new attractions, including direct competitors within the immediate vicinity of the two aquariums.

 

The leisure business is a great business as long as you are attracting a sufficient number of visitors to your property as the business is primarily fixed costs. Unfortunately, competition can easily enter the market in your vicinity decreasing the number of visitors at your property causing a decline in sales as you drop prices to attract people and an even greater decline in operating profit due to the operating leverage in the business.

 

 

Property

 

Haw Par’s owns three properties in Singapore and one in Kuala Lumpur. Of the company’s four properties, three are office buildings and one is an industrial building.

 

At the end of 2015, the company has total letable area of 45,399 square meters with an occupancy rate of 64.6%.

 

In 2015, the property division generated sales of SGD14.33 million, operating profit of SGD8.56 and ROA of 4.0%.  The division’s occupancy rate has fallen by almost 30 percentage points from 2013 to 2015, this could be due to a weaker environment or a deterioration of the properties’ competitive position as newer properties become available. I am not a big fan of property investments, as they tend to have poor return on assets and require significant leverage to generate a return near our required rate of return of 15%. On top of the poor profitability in the business, Haw Par’s occupancy rates have been falling potentially pointing to a weaker competitive position of the company’s properties.

 

 

Investments

 

Since 2012, Haw Par’s investment business accounted for 76.7% of the assets on the company’s balance sheet. At the end of 2015, United Overseas Bank (UOB:SP) accounted for 66.4% of the company’s available for sale securities, UOL Group (UOL:SP) accounted for 13.0%, and United Industrial Corp (UIC:SP) accounted for 9.5%.  United Overseas Bank, UOL Group, and United Industrial are all related parties as Wee Cho Yaw is the Chairman of Haw Par and the three other corporations.

 

Profit before tax is dividend income. Since 2012, the investment business has generated an average dividend income of 3.2%.

 

Since 1987, United Overseas Bank’s average annualized return was 7.0%, UOL Group’s was 5.2%, and United Industrial’s was 1.2%, nowhere near an acceptable return.

 

 

Management

 

Members of management are owner operators with insiders owning roughly 60% of Haw Par.  Management is doing a great job operating Tiger Balm but the rest of the business is a capital allocation nightmare with poor investments in leisure and property along with significant cross holdings in other family businesses.

 

Management also extracts far too much value with the average remuneration to key management personnel over the past two years at 9.9% of operating income. Operating income is used rather than profit before tax as the investment income and property income are poor capital allocation decision and it would be best if that money were returned to shareholders.  Since the income generated below operating profit detracts value it is best if operating profit is used. There are related party transactions outside of key management compensation. The company has no related party transactions.

 

 

Valuation

 

The poor capital allocation and management value extraction makes the business nothing more than a deep value holding, which would require at least 50% upside using conservative assumptions to be investible. To value the company, we value the healthcare business based off a multiple of operating profit and value all other division based on liquidation value due to the poor trends see in those businesses.

 

Given the quality and growth in Haw Par’s healthcare business, we believe 15 times operating profit is a fair multiple for the business. The company’s leisure business is given no value as the number of visitors continues to decline due to newer attractions and the company’s operating leverage means the company was barely breaking even in 2015. Cash and net working capital is valued at 100% of balance sheet value. The company’s property is seeing declining occupancy rates. We conservatively assume this to be a sign of the property’s deteriorating competitive position. There are also fees associated with any liquidation therefore we value the property assets at 75% of current value. The company’s available for sale securities are assumed to be liquidated at 75% of current value, as the holdings are so large that they would have a market impact if Haw Par ever tried to sell its shares.

 

Overall, Haw Par would be interesting below SGD7.50 but only as a deep value holding given the poor capital allocation and high management salaries.